Posts in the category Hacks

Hack! Make Your Road or Mountain Bike Front Shifter Activate a Dropper Post!

Thanks to the increasing popularity of 1x drivetrains for mountain bikes and cyclocross, there’s a growing collection of sad, lonely front shifters sitting around feeling unproductive.

Now, thanks to the folks at Re:Cycles Bike Shop and Seasucker bike racks, we’ve got two hacks that show how they’ve used their front shifter to work two different models of cable-actuated dropper seatposts. It’s a fairly basic hack, but does require a little disassembly to remove the pawls and a few other parts. The end result should be a spring loaded lever that won’t catch or ratchet anything – it only need to pull cable in order to actuate the release on the dropper post, then let it spring back to lock the post into position.

Above, the Charles Casagrande at Seasucker took a crashed SRAM road shifter to work a Thomson dropper post. Below, one of our local shops made an XT shifter work with an LEV…

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Video: FiberFix Jumps the Shark (Tank) to Fix Your Bicycle

Derek at FiberFix just sent over this video along with this note: “BikeRumor may consider this a total joke, but I think it’s something to consider (albeit slightly impractical).”

Attention, grabbed, so we watched the video. Pure awesome. A phone call later and we can now tell you how it works:

FiberFix was a Shark Tank success and is essentially a woven fiberglass fiber tape presoaked in a water-activated resin. To use it, simply soak the tape in water for a second, then tightly wrap the object to be fixed. Let it cure for 10-15 minutes and you’re good to go. They say it’s as strong as steel, extremely rigid and waterproof, yet can be sanded and painted. Sounds like a good emergency item to keep in the pack for backcountry rides or touring – it could easily get you back home.

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Quick Fix: Easily Pull Hydraulic Brake Hoses Through Internally Routed Frames

easily run hydraulic brake hose through bicycle frames internally with brake cable and end cap

With hydraulic brakes poised to explode on the road bike scene, both as OEM and aftermarket, the number of bicycles with internally routed designs can be a real source of headaches. Ever one for simplified solutions, this gem of a problem solver from Dave Bethea at The Bike Shop/Extreme Cycles in Ormond Beach, FL, did the trick for our SRAM Red Hydro-RD install.

All you need is a spare brake cable, cable end crimp, a hose block to hold the hose tight, adjustable pliers, cable cutters and a small hammer. You’ll want the smaller, thinner end crimps since the inside diameter of most hydraulic brake hoses are pretty small. Here’s how it’s done: READ MORE ->

Quick Fix: True A Bicycle Wheel Without Tools & Get Back Home

how to true a bicycle wheel on the road or trail without tools so you can keep riding

I carry a mini tool on virtually every ride, so it was with some surprise that I ended up stuck on the side of a road when a wheel went out of true enough that the tire started rubbing the frame. Turns out, my mini tool didn’t have spoke wrench slots built into it. Surely, I thought, this was a fluke and all the other myriad pocketable multi tools I have included them, right? No. In fact, of the fifteen or so mini tools I have laying around, very few actually do.

This can happen for a number of reasons – you hit something, someone hits you, or spokes just gradually detension. Whatever the cause, it can quickly ruin a ride and leave you calling the support vehicle (aka: significant other).

So, the easiest fix is to make sure your tool has spoke wrenches. Failing that, here’s an easy way to get back on the road…

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Found: Bad Ass Homemade Miniature Penny Farthing e-Bike

homemade miniature penny farthing e-bike

Found in downtown Asheville, NC, this miniature “bike” is powered only by a hub based motor and the side mounted battery pack. It’s throttle only, there are no actual pedals, but we’ll easily overlook that because, well, just look at it. Awesome. We chatted up the builder outside the bar, and there’s no website or anything for his craft yet. He said he’s looking into options for selling them or the design. Until then, there’s more pics after the break…

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OneUp RAD Cage Hacks Shimano Rear Derailleurs to Better Fit Oversized Cogs

OneUp Components RAD Cage replacement Shimano derailleur cage to offset pulley for oversized rear cogs

OneUp Components has introduced a few firsts in the oversized cog game, namely the 16T replacement cog. Now, the RAD Cage boosts derailleur performance at the top end of the cassette without having to reverse or extend your B-Screw.

Made for modern, clutch equipped 10-speed Shimano Deore, SLX, XT or XTR medium cage rear derailleurs, it repositions the upper pulley to improve tooth and chain clearance over 40 and 42 tooth cogs. I installed it on my Niner RIP 9 RDO, which was already running their 40T and 16T cogs. When originally setup with those two parts, I had to bury the B-Screw all the way, which just barely left enough room between the pulley and the largest cog. There was no way OneUp’s (or anyone else’s) 42T cog was fitting in there without more drastic measures. Until the RAD Cage, anyway…

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Ditch the Saddle for a Harness with the new Flying Bike!

Flying Bike 1

Inventors are always targeting the bicycle saddle as an area of improvement – after all, for non cyclists they always seem to be a source of complaints. For Architect and engineer David Schwartz however, it wasn’t how he could redesign the saddle, but how he could remove it completely. That idea drove him to create the first proof of concept for the Flying Rider, a bicycle with no seat.

David says he came up with the idea for almost the exact opposite reason you would expect. Instead of eliminated the saddle for pressure relieve, David thought that if riders had something to push against with their back, they could generate more power to the pedals and be more efficient. The final result is a prototype with a cage that surrounds the rider who is suspended in the middle with a harness.

Strap into your new flying machine, next…

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The Robert Axle Solves 142×12 MTB Trailer Woes

Robert Axle Ibis 142x12For adventures or those with kids, having the ability to tow a trailer behind their bicycle is essential. Unfortunately for those riders, they’ve been cornered out of the new bike market, because the current 142×12 standard is incompatible with virtually all of the trailers on the market.

Luckily, the aftermarket has come up with a solution in the form of the Robert Axle Project. A company which offers four different axles, with different thread pitches, that fits over 30 of the most popular bike brands.

The axles are easy to install and require no special tools. To find out if there is a solution for your bike and trailer, head over to their website here, and choose your bike and application. Most axles retail for between $52-57 and the company offers flat rate shipping of $7.0 to the US, $24 USD to Canada, and $27 Internationally.

Robert Axle Project

Ari Bike Adds 40/42-Tooth Replacement Cogs for Shimano XT/XTR and SRAM Cassettes

Ari Bike Pignoni oversized 40-tooth and 42-tooth cogs for Shimano and SRAM cassettes

Ari Bike, an Italian maker of various aftermarket spider/chainring units and spiderless chainrings for a wide variety of crankset brands, has just thrown their hat into the oversized cog ring.

Offering three distinct models, they cover Shimano XTR M980 and XT M771 10-speed and SRAM 1030/1050/1070 10-speed cassettes. Like the others, these 40- and 42-tooth cogs sidle up next to the back of the cassette and require removal of the 17t (or 15t for some versions) cog.

Claimed weight is 70g to 73g depending on model. They come with a replacement screw for your derailleur in case a longer B-screw is needed to help the mech clear the new cog. Retail is €65, with delivery available in the US via express courier. Pics and links below…

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