Paul Components Makes Quick (Release) Work of Thru Axles

paul-components-quick-release-thru-axles-sneak-peek

One of the concerns with moving to thru axles on road bikes is the time consuming process of wheel removal, a legitimate issue in the heat of the peloton or wheel pits in ‘cross. Paul Components looks like it may have a solution with their upcoming quick release thru axle skewers.

The lever design was first spotted at NAHBS this year in standard QR form, but it’s grown in diameter and options. They’ll have sizes for virtually every thru axle standard you can imagine at Interbike this year…

paul-components-quick-release-thru-axles-sneak-peek

Production versions will use a black anodized axle and be available in the following sizes:

  • 15 x 100
  • 15 x 150
  • 12 x 142
  • 12 x 177
  • 12 x 197

That should cover everything from XC to DH to FB (Fat Bike). It’ll also let you match up your thru axle front with QR rear, keeping everything tidy. Final details and pricing won’t come until Interbike, but here’s what we do know thanks a short chat with Paul:

The protected cam means the moving parts are housing inside that oval-ish shell, keeping it away from rock strikes or worse. The axles may or may not come with the nut on the end, but the thread pitch is the same as what’s standard on frames, so you can use them with any modern thru-axle frame or fork. Where the nut comes into play is with some aftermarket carbon rigid forks and with new dropouts they’re co-developing with Paragon Machine Works. The dropouts will have a slot that holds the nut and allows it to spin freely, so using these thru axles will be very, very similar to standard QR. That means easy unthreading to release it and begin able to get your lever angled just how you like it. Presumably we’ll see more on that development come NAHBS 2015.

PaulComp.com

Comments

17 thoughts on “Paul Components Makes Quick (Release) Work of Thru Axles

  1. I really wish these weren’t $58(,000) a piece.

    Shimano XT/XTR/Ultegra skewers run less than $34 a pop, and are the golden standard.

    I guess I’m not in the right income bracket for these skewers. :(

  2. @WV Cycling. Those qr skewers may be near $34 a pop but they are not thru axle. Shimano XTR Trail E-Thru Rear Axle M988 142-12 retails for around $68, and the Shimano Saint SM-AX80 12x150mm Thru-axle retails for around $120.

    @Paul Components, is there any way you could seal up the Thru Axle so I could keep Whiskey inside of it? You know for trail side repair time.

  3. Maybe (probably) I’m slow, but they appear to have threaded ends ala regular QRs. So… how to the work? Every thru axle I know of (other than 10/12×135 I suppose) has a dedicated thread/end in the fork/frame.

  4. So, 142×12 has many different options for thread pitch. 12×1.75, 12×1.5, and 12×1.25. Are they offering all three? I’m also confused about the nut. It seems like it would require a longer axle, is there a nutted version and non nutted version? We are already up to 6 skews just for 1 “standard”.

  5. @Andre: I’ve had it with bikes with disc brakes that use QRs. Getting the rotor centered to the caliper when replacing a wheel can be a real PITA. Thru axles solves that problem, and is stronger besides.

  6. So for my front wheel, I’ve found Fox’s QR15 thru axle to be just as quick as a normal wheel change. You’re still flipping a lever and twisting either way, one just requires more checking to see if you hit the tightness correctly.

    Granted, if you file down your lawyer lips, normal QR will be quicker – but stock, if anything, I agree with @John – I find it easier to get my front wheel in with a QR15 thru axle than normal QR.

    The rear wheel does take a little longer, but we’re talking a second or two, which for most mere mortals is nothing.

    that said, I don’t see a need for a thru axle on the rear of a road bike – it’s not like they need to help stiffen up a structure compromised by pivots and linkages, nor do they see the kind of impact loading mountain bike components do. Even front forks are questionable on road bikes. For mountain bikes, they make a BIG difference, but that’s due to the suspension and load case.

  7. Jon Palmer – 08/19/14 – 4:13pm

    @WV Cycling. Those qr skewers may be near $34 a pop but they are not thru axle. Shimano XTR Trail E-Thru Rear Axle M988 142-12 retails for around $68, and the Shimano Saint SM-AX80 12x150mm Thru-axle retails for around $120.

    Valid response. I don’t MTB much, so I’m naive/ignorant on those data points.

  8. JonB, My view of the only real reason for thru axel in the rear on cross and road bikes is to easily align the disc brake in the caliper every time.

  9. Sounds too good to be true to be quite honest. At least with the Focus Bikes RAT thru axle design there is a way to open/close the RAT thru axle with quickness and precision.

    I don’t get the Paul design. It’s just a concept and it might work, but either the article should explain how it works better, or Paul components just needs to put a YouTube video demonstrating how this product works.

  10. @Ajax – 08/19/14 – 11:24pm

    It’s the same design a Shimano QR has, raise the level who has a very small level on the inside, pressing the forklegs together, it’s a very simple and effective design.
    The only difference is that the nuts are always in the fork, it’s a open-ended QR.

    What about mud/dirt (MTB) in the outer end of threading in the fork?

    ” One of the concerns with moving to thru axles on road bikes is the time consuming process of wheel removal, a legitimate issue in the heat of the peloton or wheel pits in ‘cross.”

    It’s not a problem for me, but aren’t these professional racers a minority?
    Most of peoples have good time when they got a puncture, and it’s usually nobody who have wheels ready for swap. :)
    I am somewhat bewildered that companies comes up with new solutions who doesn’t do anything for the casual rider, the one who just enjoys to take a ride.
    I have a Slow Release with 10 mm nuts and 15mm wrench! :)

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