New Eddy Merckx Bikes for Speed, Endurance, Women and Cyclocross (UPDATED)

Eddie Merckx Mourenx69

UPDATED: Geometry, Release date for Eeklo70 Cyclocross Bikes

 Eddy Merckx today released details on his company’s complete lineup for 2015, including four new models specifically targeted to pure speed, endurance riding, women, and cyclocross. The four new bikes join Merckx’s pro racing machine, the EMX-525, which carries over from 2014.

Like the EMX-525, commemorating Merckx’s 525 professional wins, each of the new models is named for The Cannibal’s accomplishments. The endurance focused Mourenx69, pictured above, and which we covered yesterday, is named for his 140km breakaway win into Mourenx at the 1969 Tour de France. The new San Remo76 is a purely speed focused machine named for his ninth win at La Primavera. The new Eeklo70, named for Merckx’s only cyclocross win of his career, is the company’s first bike offering disc brakes, and its first carbon ‘cross frameset. The new women’s bike, the Milano72, is named for the fashion capital where he both started his winning ride in Milan-San Remo and finished his third Giro victory in 1972. Tying all the bikes together is what Merckx calls their four pillars: Speed, Stiffness, Stability, and Safety and a guiding vision of “Power Under Control.”

We have details on lineup, including US models and pricing, geometry charts, lots of pictures, and a video after the break…

EMX-525

EMX 525 Ultegra Di2 Fulcrum

EMX 525 Ultegra Di2 Fulcrum

Merckx’s top of the line race bike is largely unchanged from 2014. Built with absurdly strong 600 GPa carbon, the claimed  stiffness for the head tube is 150 NM and the bottom bracket is 215 NM. The Aerofork II fork features an over sized crown to optimize steering forces, and the bike has both asymmetrical seatstays and chainstays to balance pedaling loads.

The EMX-525 will be available in the US in four builds or as a frameset, and Merckx offers a customization program through its dealer network if you want to trick out your build; only two color schemes are offered. The full zoot Dura Ace Di2 build includes a Zipp 303 wheelset, Deda Superleggera cockpit, and Prologo Scratch Pro Nack saddle for $12,495. The same build for mechanical DA is $9,995. Di2 (pictured above) and mechanical Ultegra builds with Fulcrum Racing Quattro wheels, a Deda Zero cockpit and the Prologo Triox saddle are $7,295 and $6,295, respectively. A notable choice in the spec across all four models is the use of the Pro Compact crankset running 52-36 chainrings, paired to an 11-25 cassette. The frameset is $4,995, and there are seven sizes from 48 to 60. Geometry is unchanged from 2014.

San Remo76

Promotional video for the San Remo72

In 1976, Eddie Merckx lined up for his ninth Milan-San Remo, the 300km Spring Classic. Nearing the end of his career, he succeeded in beating a peloton full of younger, faster sprinters, easily dropping the last man in the final 300 meters. Commemorating that win, the Merckx San Remo72 is a pure speed machine. Built with lower strength 300 and 400 NM carbon fiber than the EMX-525, the bike offers aggressive riders a more affordable alternative.

The bike will only be available with Ultegra Di2 ($5,095) or mechanical ($3,995), running Fulrum 5s, a Deda Zero cockpit, and the Prologo Zero saddle. Frameset-only is $2,995.

2015_San_Remo_76__CGW_Shimano_Ultegra_Fulcrum

San Remo76 Ultegra mechanical

Like the EMX-525, the bike is designed to keep the rider long and low.

 

Merckx Geometry GuideSan Remo76 Geometry Chart

Eddie Merckx San Remo76 Ult Di2

Eddy Merckx San Remo76 Ultegra Di2 with FFWD wheels available through customization program

 

Eeklo70

2015 Eeklo Ultegra Disc

The new Eeklo70 is Merckx’s first disc brake equipped bike, and Merckx’s first carbon cyclocross steed. The bike will be available in two builds, the hydraulic disc equipped Ultegra 11 speed mechanical shown above, or with the new 11 speed Shimano 105 gruppo with cantilever brakes shown below. Both use the same carbon layup as the other new Merckx bikes, a first for the company, which in the past only offered aluminum frames, and put team riders on competing brands’ frames with Merckx paint. The Ultegra bike is built up with Deda Zero 100 bar, stem, and post, and a set of Shimano RX31 wheels under the rather uninspired Vittoria XG Pro tires. The Ultegra bike is geared for speed, with a traditional 36  and 46-tooth chainrings tied to a relatively big small 12-25 cassette, versus the 12-27 or 11-26 many riders prefer.

The 11 speed 105 bike uses Shimano CX50 cantilever brakes, entry level Deda components, and the Fulcrum Racing Sport CX wheels. Its comes geared with a huge 11-32 cassette, making well suited for ultracross racing and touring, but most likely sacrificing reliable shifting in muddy conditions. Thankfully, both bikes are built around a BSA threaded bottom bracket, rather than a press fit BB, which are notoriously creaky in off road applications. Merckx is offering six sizes from 48 to 58, neither frameset is available on its own, and each build is only available in the pictured color schemes. The bikes are priced at $3,999 and $2,799. A geometry chart was unavailable. UPDATE: Merckx expects US availability in December, and here is the geometry chart:

Merckx Eeklo70 Geometry Chart

2015_Eeklo_Shimano_105

Eeklo70 with the more subdued 105 cantilever gruppo and paint job

 

Milano72

2015_Milano_Shimano_Ultegra

The all new “Cannibal ride for women,” the Milano72, is pitched as a bike that emphasizes stability. Using the Female Race Geometry introduced in 2014, Merckx aims to create a riding position that rotates the pelvis back to reduce pressure on the perineum, arms, and shoulders. The bike is built with the same carbon layup as the San Remo72 and Moureax69, so expect a similarly responsive ride.

Merckx is releasing three sizes: 40, 43, and 46, which based on the conventions used in their other models, probably translates to something around 49 to 55 cm effective top tube measurements. Unfortunately, we do not have geometry charts. There will only be a single build option and one color scheme. The bike will come equipped with full Ultegra 11 speed mechanical, Fulcrum Racing 5 wheels, and a Deda Zero 100 cockpit. Like the ‘cross bikes, the bike uses a normal seatpost in lieu of an integrated mast. It comes geared with a very forgiving combination of a compact crank and 11-28 cassette. Unique to the entire Merckx line, the bottom bracket is Italian threaded. Pricing is set at $3,995.

Eddie Merckx Milano72

The Milano72 in her natural habitat

Mourenx69

2015_Mourenx_69_SWR_Shimano_Ultegra_DI2

We covered the new endurance bike in depth yesterday, but US pricing, specs, and geometry are now available.

The Mourenx69 will only be available as a complete bike with Ultegra Di2 or mechanical gruppos and Fulcrum Racing 5 wheels. The endurance oriented bike will be geared with a 50-34 compact crank and 11-28 cassette, and has the Ultegra 6700 brakes, meaning maximum tire diameter is limited to 25 mm. The complete bikes are priced at $5,095 and $3,995, and the frameset will set you back $2,995 – better than than yesterday’s quote based on the Euro exchange rate. If you want to get the über sexy Campy build we drooled over yesterday – or make any other changes to the bike spec – you dealer can go through Merckx’s customization program.

The geometry numbers alluded to in yesterday’s post are below, providing a better understanding of how the Mourenx69 (and, yes, it is pronounced MORE-awn) compares to the more aggressive San Remo72.

Mourenx69 Geometry Chart

 

EddyMerckx.com

Comments

Gunnstein - 08/19/14 - 4:03pm

So Merckx (or is it BikeRumor?) has concluded that women don’t do speed, endurance, and cyclocross riding – they do woman riding. Glad that’s clarified.

Mark @ GRAVELBIKE - 08/19/14 - 4:13pm

Eddy, not Eddie.

John - 08/19/14 - 4:41pm

Please correct the spelling error in the title…

Eddy Merckx.

Andrew Stackhouse - 08/19/14 - 5:17pm

That’s shameful. Thanks for the catch.

Ann - 08/19/14 - 5:47pm

Gunnstein – Um, there’s nothing sexist about it, I think you’re reading way too into it. It’s a road/endurance bike that has a geometry specialized for women riders, who generally, have shorter torsos than men. You could just as well get along with a small-frame cycloscross bike if that’s what you’re looking for. (deleted)

Mark @ GRAVELBIKE - 08/19/14 - 10:02pm

One of the captions still as the spelling as Eddie.

CXisfun - 08/19/14 - 10:39pm

“Its comes geared with a huge 11-32 cassette, making well suited for ultracross racing and touring, but most likely sacrificing reliable shifting in muddy conditions.”

Huh?

And since when is a 12-25 cassette on a CX bike “relatively big”? Relative to what?

mudrock - 08/20/14 - 12:54am

Odd that the Eeklo has traditional cross gearing in the Ultegra/disc model (except the 12-25, smaller than usual) but wide gearing, with a compact crank, in the 105/canti model. The “ultracross/touring crowd” would prefer the discs, I would think.

Gunnstein - 08/20/14 - 3:45am

Ann – Not saying Merckx and/or BikeRumor are intentionally sexist, but don’t you think this is rather odd? “…specifically targeted to pure speed, endurance riding, women, and cyclocross.” It’s pretty much saying that e.g. cyclocross is a sport for men, and women should be happy with a more general purpose bike. Hopefully women can find bikes that fit them in every category, but those responsible should do some more work on the message here.

Tomi - 08/20/14 - 4:39am

@Ann : “women riders, who generally, have shorter torsos than men.” Source ?

Andrew Stackhouse - 08/20/14 - 10:32am

@CXisfun: most amateur racers I’ve ever come across run their bikes with a 12-27 or 11-26; I use a 13-26 because I’m a Campy nut. That said, I really should have said “small” – I’m new enough to bike writing that I’m still picking up the conventions. It’s also been my experience that wide range cassettes on two chain ring drive trains have less reliable shifting in really ugly conditions.

@mudrock: I should have mentioned my other theory, that “entry level” CX bikes often seem targeted at riders for whom the easier gearing will be more attractive. Personally, I think this is a mistake, as most first time CX bike buyers are considerably more experienced than, say, a first time road bike rider. As someone who came into CX from MTB racing, I was frustrated by the available options back when triple chainrings and bar top levers were the norm for <$1K bikes.

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