Lean Machine – The Gluten Free Sport Recovery Beer?

 

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The post ride beer is already a staple in many bike rides, so I guess it should come as no surprise that a new company is targeting the post ride bevy. Specifically, the Canadian brewed Lean Machine is being marketed as a “Fit Beer” or a sport recovery beer. While the specifics of the beer aren’t really listed, if we’re to believe the label Lean Machine will be a gluten free beer with 77 calories, and a miniscule 0.5% ABV. But the label also says that it is a Lager Ale, which the last time I checked a beer is either a Lager or an Ale, not both. Maybe Lean Machine is a Lager brewed with Ale yeast? Or the label could be just a mock up which is far more likely.

The real question here is would you buy a beer that was specifically marketed to fitness or recovery? Taste will certainly have a lot to do with it, though it will probably taste along the lines of other “skinny” beers. Rather than a Kickstarter, Lean Machine is currently generating funding through preorders on their website. Instead of just preordering product, you have the opportunity to buy a Shareholder’s Exclusive which includes a 24 pack of Lean Machine when it’s available, $150 of Lean Machine Brands Inc. stock, a hat and shirt, plus and invite to the launch party in Kelowna, BC or Calgary, AB. There is also a double stock option for $300 which includes an extra 24 pack as well.

Hat tip to my friend Kathy on the tip!

Comments

25 thoughts on “Lean Machine – The Gluten Free Sport Recovery Beer?

  1. Why would I want a low calorie recovery beverage after a hard ride? Low cal foods & drinks are for couch potatoes, not people living an active lifestyle.

  2. My post ride beer could be devils’ piss or MGD for all I care, as long as its freezing cold and in a can I can crush while injecting it down my gullet.

  3. I enjoy riding immensely aside from the health benefits, but I also do it SO THAT I can “recover” with heavy, strong, and delicious beers that would send an inactive person to an early grave. I’m sure there’s a market for it, but it seems like a product not quite beneficial enough for hardcore athletes, and not nearly tasty enough for recreational riders.

  4. A lager and an ale?! It’s the best of both worlds! As soon as the Nigirean prince send me my money, I’m totaly in on this. Come to think of it, I gave him my account number a week ago, I should check up on that….

  5. Meanwhile… me and my riding buddies are enjoying post-ride tacos and ACTUAL BEER (made from beer) at the local cantina. Come join us!

  6. Why bother with a .5% alcohol drink in the first place?? If I want hydration there are plentiful alcohol free optins.
    But when I want a beer (daily) I want it all or none! I want high-gravity pile-driver to my taste buds overwhelmingly hoppy, or dark and toasty malty beer. Don’t try to pull off some decaffeinated equivalent BS and foist on sports enthusiasts.

  7. maybe when they take the “beer” out their “bheer?” they could donate it to…me. and then i would share it with you. after a ride. maybe in the woods. maybe near a fire.

  8. What a load of marketing BS. I’m surprised that they didn’t describe it as “Like Michelob Ultra, but Even More Magical”. That is going to end up being a BYOB launch party I’ll wager.

  9. The best recovery beer is Hefeweizen or other wheat beers. A quality German Hefeweizen like a Weinstephaner has the anti-inflammatory effect similar to advil, it’s refreshing, non hoppy, and just delicious.

    But to be 100% honest about nutrition, no beer at all is ideal, sorry.

  10. In Belgium, while sampling all kinds of wild stuff, I had a low ABV beer, something around 1% or so, that was delicious. Exellent balance, light taste, crisp, reminded me of a cola or root beer more than other beer style. Malty sweet, you have to really try to taste any alcohol, and milder complementary flavoring than hops. Is apparently some kind of seasonal celebratory beer, but can’t remember the name.

    In any case, they served it up for what it was, an excellent albeit low ABV quirky beer. (Yes, folks, the two are not mutually exclusive… although they usually are.) Not a “recovery beverage.”

    Unless they’ve nailed some kind of interesting, balanced taste, any time I want watered down beer, I’ll have a shandy.

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