IB13: Fair Wheel Bikes, Part 2 – Cherubim’s Rather Odd Twin Downtube & Kelly Bedford Di2 Sequential Shift Road Bikes

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The 8.88lb Crumpton road bike and almost-as-light carbon BMX bike were the lightest in Fair Wheel Bikes’ booth (covered in Part 1), but the Cherubim was easily the most unique looking.

The frame used a curved twin down tube that was easily more aesthetic than structural, but not entirely without function. Behind it was a Kelly Bedford that was arguably the best looking bike in their booth and also the most technologically advanced…

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Shift cables are funneled into the twin tubes and the rear brake cable is fed into the top tube.

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From there, they pop out and run down the seat tube and are routed to the derailleurs.

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The brake cable curves under the BB to the hidden rear brake. The rear axle slides in from the back and has to be tightened down with tools. No QR lever to kill the aesthetics.

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And no Fair Wheel build would be complete without something carbon and super light.

KELLY BEDFORD

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Kelly Bedford’s polished, lugged frame would be worthy of a post on it’s own, but they managed to hide some impressive tech on it, too.

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The rear brake cable snakes out of the top tube, through the seat tube and down to the eeBrake.

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The retro looking brake levers have push buttons mounted to the inside. One side shifts up, the other shifts down, and it’s all controlled by electronics hidden inside the stem. Fair Wheel’s used this before on a mountain bike, but it’s still impressive.

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It was also sporting a paint-matched set of eeCranks, which sadly won’t be going into production any time soon.

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Pretty lugs and paint.

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Stay tuned, there’s a Part 3 coming soon…

KellyBedford.com
Cherubim.jp
FairWheelBikes.com

Comments

Chris - 09/20/13 - 11:40pm

That Cherubim is not a bike that I need at all but I would love to own it. I’m not even sure what it is about it. Usually I’m not so into their designs but this one has a certain je nais se quoi to it. The rest are neat in a non-traditional way but this thing just looks wild.

It’s even red. And I hate red!

tiles - 09/21/13 - 12:46pm

the 10lb bmx bike was impressive. The bars were a work of art.

patrik - 09/21/13 - 2:14pm

These are the type of bikes people ride to coffee shops, post them prominently within 5 feet, then eagerly attack anybody that shows any interest whatsoever at their rolling talking piece.

“Yea, I rode 50 miles before I got here,” they say, when they actually rode around the block just to park their bike and brag about it to whoever will listen.

Some people start smoking just for the socialization aspect (gotta talk to someone while you’re relegated to being outside the bar); others get functionally useless/aesthetically beautiful bikes to achieve the same conversation starting strategy.

Psi Squared - 09/21/13 - 3:58pm

That Cherubim is beautiful aesthetically and in terms of design.

Sam - 09/21/13 - 5:50pm

Do they make expensive bikes with 27″ (ISO 630) wheels? It would be cool if those made a comeback.

The Guy - 09/21/13 - 7:25pm

patrik – TL;DR

scott - 09/21/13 - 11:38pm

These are some of the best bikes at the show. One off custom bikes meant for one customer. I love reliable bikes that are meant to be ridden everyday, but these are examples of some new unique ideas and clean execution. Sometimes we need some unique ideas to come up with great solutions!

duder - 09/22/13 - 8:38pm

It’s so weird to me that Fairwheel is at Interbike and showing up in the press. They used to be my regular neighborhood shop (well it still is really, they still stock Spec. Hardrocks alongside $9k wunderbikes). Anyway, that’s pretty cool and I’m glad they’re doing well. They’re famous for ‘The Shootout’: Tucson’s fastest road ride.

blair - 10/07/14 - 10:05pm

I’m late to this comment section but had to respond to patrik. That’s just hating on a bike and it’s rider. The craftsman who made it is obviously very talented (that’s an understatement) and you have no idea how many miles anyone rides. Maybe they own twenty bikes and one of them they put 500 miles per week on and the rest they can enjoy any way they please.. I wonder what you ride. Maybe you ride a “modest” older road bike that you paid $50 for at a yard sale. That makes you a better person..? Take it easy. Are you really gonna sit there and say that you don’t dream of owning some bike that is currently out of reach for you? I’m sure there is someone with no bike who has seen you with your bike and thought,”look at this prick with his bike. Probably rides around all day talking shit and not appreciating what he has”.

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