SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

Continuing with the onslaught of 650b, Marin made good on their pre-Sea Otter teaser with not one, but three new 650b options. We assumed they would have 650b carbon full suspension bikes based on that sneak peek, but the 650b All Mountain hardtail was certainly a surprise. In addition to the new wheel sizes on the mountain side, Marin is taking their Cortina cross bike into the realm of carbon as well. As they sit, all of the bikes are currently prototypes with an official launch later in the year.

Check out the new bikes as well as the return of the Attack Trail after the jump.

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

With the advent of 29 inch wheels, the trail/AM hard tail took an interesting turn. Built more for plowing through rough terrain than jumping over it, 29″ AM hard tails are somewhat limited by wheelbase and handlebar height. Enter the 650b AM hard tail, like Marin’s new Rocky Ridge. Still, in order to keep the wheelbase as short as possible a drastically curved seat tube is employed on a very burly looking aluminum frame.

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

The 130mm travel Rocky Ridge has all of the features you would expect on a modern bike like a 142×12 rear axle, internal dropper post routing (external cable routing), tapered head tube, and multiple front chain management options like ISCG mounts, front derailleur, etc. A 67.5 degree head tube keeps the front end within realm of trail/AM.

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

After a bit of a disappearing act, The Attack Trail is back on the scene as a 650b and in carbon. With the reintroduction of the Attack Trail, Marin was able to make the Mount Vision back into the fast, burly XC bike that it was initially intended to be. Stepping into the 150mm role for Marin, the Attack Trail is designed to be used with 150 or 160mm forks with an effective HTA of 67 or 66 degrees.

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

Like other bikes in the new line up, the Attack Trail offers Marin’s 4 in 1 cabling system which allows for internal or external cable routing with either full housing or partial housing. Internal housing is handles nicely with four ports in the frame on the upper left section of the head tube, exiting just in front of derailleurs and brakes. Of course the Attack Trail has a 142×12 rear axle and tapered head tube, though home mechanics might be happy to see the use of a threaded 73mm bottom bracket with an adapter system for various chain guides. Unlike the Mount Vision, the Attack trail retains the use of Marin’s Quadlink which is considered an SDL (short dual link) system.

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

The new Mount Vision on the other hand receives a new suspension platform called Isotrac which utilizes a carbon flex stay design in place of the lower link. The point of the new suspension system which is only found on the Mount Vision, was to allow for the bike to have 140mm of travel yet keep it right around 25lbs. As mentioned, Marin really wanted the new Mount Vision to be a really fast, yet burly XC bike rather than a lightweight trail bike so it is built with a 67.5 HTA.

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

Isotrac uses a one piece carbon seatstay – chainstay combination that is attached the the frame just above the bottom bracket and at the top through a traditional link. Under compression the rear stays will flex altering the suspension from a simple single pivot. Mount vision also receives the neat cable management and multiple cable routing options, along with a threaded bottom bracket with optional guide plates – a trend Marin is using across the line.

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

Now for something that isn’t 650b, Marin’s Cortina cross bike will jump to the carbon category for 2014. Only shown with disc brakes, this seems to be the other trend that was unavoidable at the show.

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

Part of the carbon construction of the frame is the inclusion of Marin’s power taper seat tube which flares out as it meets the down tube for maximum stiffness yet to retain compliance at the saddle. Cortina carbons will be compatible with both mechanical and electronic shifting groups and will be able to run internal cabling with full or partial housing. The cross bike will see a threaded bottom bracket as well.

SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser SOC13: Marin Previews 3 New 650b Bikes, Carbon Crosser

Disc brakes will be tucked inside the stays in a way that brakes like TRP’s HyRd are compatible – something that could be a bit of an issue thanks to their tall design. A tapered head tube is found at front on a full carbon fork with post mount disc tabs.

 

 

 

Comments

Brian - 04/24/13 - 4:04pm

Hopefully those color schemes are protos too. Wouldn’t want 2013 plastered over my rides…

BenG - 04/24/13 - 4:11pm

I read somewhere that the date on those bikes is when the new paint scheme is going to be released. Those looked good in the booth this year, it’ll be interesting to see how they work out pricing and model specs.

Dan Planwell - 04/24/13 - 4:34pm

“Built more for plowing through rough terrain than jumping over it, 29? AM hard tails are somewhat limited by wheelbase and handlebar height.”

Interesting idea.

Can you explain how it actually works in practice, on the bike, on the trail.

Let’s say Harvey Hipster is on his 27.5 and Ollie Oldschool is on his 26.0 and Bill Babyboomer is on his 29.0.

What if Ollie has a 2.5″ rise bar and upward-angle stem on his 26 and Bill has a flat bar with negative-angle stem. Is Bill still at disadvantage?

What if Ollie’s bike is a Motobecane with 17.5″ chainstay and Bill’s bike is an On-One with 17.1″ chainstay?

***********

Admit you’re pumping 27.5 to sell more bikes. Admit that selling more bikes is “growing the sport,” if you really need to deceive yourself.

But please, own the fact that the Goldilocks Argument about 27.5 is BS.

Please.

Brian - 04/24/13 - 4:40pm

The carbon AM hardtail looks like a super exciting alternative to the On One carbon 456!

Zach Overholt - 04/24/13 - 5:51pm

@Dan, are you arguing that 29ers are the perfect bike for everyone? I still find many 29ers to be a bit awkward on the trail for someone my size (5’8″) and 27.5 does seem to be a good option. I’d say it’s more of a wheelsize thing than handlebar height, but when companies are having to make -25 degree or more stems and flat bars to try and get the bars low enough you have to wonder if it’s really the right fit. I really don’t care if people buy more bikes or not, but I am interested in finding the right bike for the job and not just jumping on a band wagon whether it is 29, 27.5 or sticking with 26″.

Solo - 04/24/13 - 9:12pm

We went from fully rigid bikes to HTs, from Chromoly to Al. to Ti to carbon, from U brakes to cantilever to V brakes to disc brakes, from flat pedals to toe clips to clipless, from 7 speed to 8 to 9 to 10 and now to 11, from HT to FS, from 26″ to 69″ to 29er to 27.5″…

Whether we like it or not, that is exactly what keeps the cycling industry alive. Same story with electronics, cars, fashion…

The good news is that running to adopt “the next best thing”, or not, is an individual decision.

Seraph - 04/25/13 - 2:31pm

The “paint jobs” are actually just stickers on the matte black frames.

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