Bianchi’s New Infinito CV Borrows From Nasa, introduces Countervail for Cycling

Bianchi's New Infinito CV Borrows From Nasa, introduces Countervail for Cycling

Sadly, there might not be a space program any more, but that isn’t stopping Bianchi from using some space age technologies in their new Infinito CV Endurance Road bike. Just days before the legendary Paris-Roubaix – one of the toughest races in the world on both bike and rider, Bianchi launched their new bike so it can be used by Vacansoleil-DCM’s Jaun Antonio Flecha on Sunday. Utilizing a proven viscoelastic material named Countervail, the Infinito CV is said to immediately cancel road vibration.

More on the first use of Countervail for cycling after the break.

Bianchi's New Infinito CV Borrows From Nasa, introduces Countervail for Cycling

Collaborating directly with the USA’s Material sciences Corporation, Bianchi figured out a way to embed the Countervail material within the carbon layup of the frame. Just how much viscoelastic material is embedded in the frame and what effect it has on the weight is unknown, but Bianchi claims there is enough to immediately cancel road vibration felt through the frame. Viscoelastic material has been used for padding, body armor, and other uses in cycling industry before but using the term viscoelastic is kind of like saying styrofoam. There are many different types of materials, each with different characteristics.

Countervail has already been used in the ski and snowboardindustry with Wagner Ski’s working it into the design of their skis to improve the flex and damping characteristics. Originally developed to prevent flutter in the carbon fiber control panels of supersonic air craft, Countervail is essentially a sheet of viscoelastic polymer cloth that has the carbon fiber strands woven through it – so it is able to be built in with very little additional weight.

Bianchi's New Infinito CV Borrows From Nasa, introduces Countervail for Cycling

Bianchi’s CEO, Bob Ippolito says, “We are really excited to introduce a revolutionary vibration cancelling technology for cycling with our new Infinito CV model. Thanks to our close collaboration with MSC’s engineers we developed a new exclusive patented material technology that will deliver better performance with less fatigue and more control.”

Thomas Cassin, the President and CEO of MSC added, “MSC and Bianchi have entered into a license and trademark use agreement enabling Bianchi to utilize the Countervail patented technology and registered trademark within the bicycle industry. MSC has collaborated with Bianchi to incorporate Countervail technology in Bianchi Bicycles, starting with the new Infinito CV model announced today. ”

Bianchi's New Infinito CV Borrows From Nasa, introduces Countervail for Cycling

Not only does the Countervail cancel road vibration, but supposedly it also increases frame rigidity. So – stiffer frame, smoother ride? Sounds straight out of science fiction. The aerodynamically shaped Infinito CV will carry on Bianchi’s Coast to Coast (C2C) geometry designed specifically for endurance road riding with a taller, more upright seating position.

Perhaps the biggest bombshell of the whole release? The fact that the Infinito CV will be available in a hydraulic disc brake version. Details are slim, but apparently the disc version will be built on a 135mm rear spacing that will accept 140-160mm rotors.

Comments

Nash - 04/05/13 - 8:29am

What happens all the vibration energy, will it be transferred into heat?

Marc - 04/05/13 - 8:56am

@Nash, hopefully the frame will light up :)

BBB - 04/05/13 - 9:11am

Pneumatic tyres are the most effective suspension system on a road bike especially for high frequency vibrations.
If they don’t do their job properly you are doing something wrong… (too narrow, too hard)

gravity - 04/05/13 - 9:20am

Is there any “major” brand as yawn-inducing as Bianchi is these days? They make Trek and Specialized seem exciting.

Zap? - 04/05/13 - 9:23am

Hey Bianchi, the next time you’re making a press release in a Microsoft product and it’s underlining words in red like that, simply right click and “ignore once” and those red lines will go away. :)

As for the frame tech, it sounds interesting, but it’s also why people think carbon frames feel “dead”.

1Pro - 04/05/13 - 9:34am

couldn’t they just use bamboo and save the environment at the same time? according to my research bamboo is the only material that dampens vibration.

but then again, i do all my research on BR.com

Steve M - 04/05/13 - 10:15am

“Sadly there is no space program anymore”

The space program is alive and well.

Jose - 04/05/13 - 11:13am

I too wondered if they had forgotten to remove the MS word spell check, but I believe that is what they chose to underline their important parts.

Either way, pretty hilarious.

A. - 04/05/13 - 11:05pm

I have to say that as a Bianchi dealer I’ve been surprised by the response the Infinito’s have received. I, too, drank a lot of Trekalizedale Cool-Aid over the years and didn’t consider the brand a “major player”. I decided to bring them in as supplemental line. The Infinito’s, however, get sold almost every time against after a test ride. People love the way these frames handle and feel. Every single time I’m told that they feel more balanced and smoother compared to some of the bigger brands and even some of the more boutique ones. Their aluminum Impulso’s get a similar response against other comparable bikes.

Psi Squared - 04/06/13 - 7:56pm

@ Nash: yes, the energy from the vibrations will be turned into heat in the viscoelastic layer…..er…..Countervail layer. It’s not going to be a great amount of heat.

Gary - 04/09/13 - 3:08am

BBB – Pneumatic tyres are the most effective suspension system on a road bike especially for high frequency vibrations.
If they don’t do their job properly you are doing something wrong… (too narrow, too hard)

Yes, absolutely. Unless you’re a racer, there’s no reason to deprive yourself of the pleasure of 33mm tires run at lower pressures. They can conquer any bad road or dirt path. So much simpler and less expensive than “viscoelastic” material, elastic frame inserts, seat tube/top tube decouplers, and other such techie workarounds. (Actually, there is one self-imposed reason for not using wide tires: road bikes from the big manufacturers-marketers don’t provide enough clearance to use them. Pity.)

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