American Classic Adds XX1 11-Speed Freehub Body, Most 2013 Wheels Available Now

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Most of American Classic’s 2013 goods are in their warehouse with fresh graphics, and 650B wheels are in stock for Race, Terrain and All-Mountain wheels.

XX1 freehub bodies (photo above provided by AC, taken by Dirt Rag) will be available in February. Part of the delay in more brands having this upgrade ready was that SRAM originally only brought in DT Swiss as a wheel partner. Just before Eurobike, they opened it up to all brands, so the others are playing a bit of catch up.

For Lefty fans, the 29er wheels with Lefty hubs are now available in Race and standard mountain bike tubeless sets.

For road and cyclocross, the disc brake alloy tubulars wheels and TCX tubeless clincher disc brake wheels are in stock, and both are good for either discipline. The new alloy tubular rims will be laced to standard hubs, too, but they’re not expected to hit their warehouse until mid-December.

Also in is the 11-speed Shimano freehub bodies. They recommend that you get your shop to re-dish your wheels appropriately if you’re doing a retrofit, or you can order a new set of wheels with it preinstalled that’s ready to go out of the box. If you’re retrofitting, you’ll simply swap in the 11-speed freehub body. If you’re ordering one of the new 11-speed ready wheelsets, you’ll simply need a spacer to take up the extra 1.85mm width.

For full coverage on these items, check our Eurobike post here.

Comments

Devin - 10/27/12 - 3:01pm

Badass. While I still feel like adding more cogs to the rear is a step in the wrong direction (high efficiency gearbox with much lower unsprung weight: better imho,) XX1 is a pretty awesome setup, and the one I would choose if building a new trail bike.

BTW- nice job American Classic on three different width rims for 650b wheels, not everybody needs the same thing and it’s nice to see component manufacturers responding to that (a lot like the Syntace wheel system.)

Steven - 10/28/12 - 3:28am

Man, that last paragraph sure doesn’t make things very clear:

1) You’ll need a shop to re-dish it, if you’re retrofitting. (Retrofitting to what system?)

2) If you’re retrofitting, you’ll simply swap in the 11 speed freehub body (contradicts statement #1)

3) If you’re ordering one of the new 11-speed ready wheelsets, you’ll simply need a spacer to take up the extra 1.85mm width (when running what drivetrain?)

Most readers can probably make the logical leap to figure out what it is you are trying to say. But it is very unclear taken by itself. ESPECIALLY when the last paragraph follows a bunch of information about 11 speed SRAM mountain.

And to say that DT Swiss was there only wheel partner? It’s essential to point out that DT Swiss hubs are used in Roval, Giant, and Trek housebrand wheels. By association, Sram basically showed everybody that really needed to know (for frame compatibility etc), just by showing DT Swiss. Seems logical to me. Do you really expect them to ring up American Classic, and other small to medium companies every time they have something ground breaking?

Psi Squared - 10/28/12 - 9:47am

Fortunately there are a lot more wheel brands than DT Swiss. It is far from true that “By association, SRAM basically showed everyone what they need to know. Off hand there is American Classic, Mavic, White Industries, Hope, Ritchey, Chris King, Industry 9, Crankbrothers, Easton, FSA, Fulcrum, Stan’s, Sun-Ringle, Velocity, WTB,…….more……… Steven, did you notice how none of the above–and many not included–don’t run DT hubs or DT internals?

Cody - 10/28/12 - 7:31pm

Steven,
1 – Retro fitting to Shimano 11 speed, first sentence third paragraph
2 – Swap the body and re-dish to match the body so the wheel is as strong as possible – no special additional parts needed, second sentence third paragraph
3 – I will agree that the way its written is confusing. All Shimano 11 speed bodies are 1.85mm longer than a standard 10 speed. You can run a 10-speed cassette on an 11 speed body if you use a 1.85mm spacer :)

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