UPDATED: 2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike Final Unveil – Speed Simplified

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

Here’s our first actual hands-on look at the new 2012 Cervelo P5 up close.  After months of anticipation and speculation (here, here and here), the bike has made its official debut.  The Canary Island of Fuerteventura is providing us with an incredible backdrop to see this bike first hand for its public release.  As you can see from all of the pictures that leaked out earlier this week, this new TT/Tri offering from Cervelo has an incredibly fast, clean, simple look as well as incredible sex appeal.  More detailed pictures and information after the break…

UPDATED: Sizing, Full Geometry, and More Info after the break!

The P5 mini site URL released last week could be considered the bike’s mission statement.  Simply Faster has been a theme for the past few days, from the new frame design, to some of the added features, this setup strives to achieve simplified design while increasing speed.  Cervelo focused on four major zones to improve upon.  The Frame, Aerobar, Brake, and Storage/Hydration areas have all seen significant changes and improvements.

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

First things first, the P5 frame. It’s a leap forward from any of their previous offerings with some genuine innovation in the mix as well.  Featuring a “Comfort Ply” carbon layup which was created for the Cervelo CA project lends a platform that is not only incredibly stiff, but is said to be extremely compliant.  DNA from the S5 can be spotted throughout the new Tri/TT module.  The tube shapes throughout the P5 have “Zoned” airflow designs to optimize true aero shapes.  Beginning from the front, the new “True Aero” head tube is still 1 1/8″ and is a perfect aero match for this frame.  This design is simple, and has proven to work well.  There will be two different fork options available, both of which are set wide to increases stiffness and reduce weight.  One fork is UCI compliant, and another option that is not UCI compliant (designed exclusively for triathlon use.)

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

Along with changes to the head tube come changes to the downtube and bottom bracket area.  This frame is now using the BBright system found on the R5 and S5.  At first glance, the new downtube looks like a slightly amplified version of what is found on the S5.  No more useless built-in water bottle, this downtube/bottom bracket junction is all business.

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

Inside of the area seen above the bottom bracket is the new “Hidden Pocket.”  This area seamlessly hides a  Shimano Di2 battery completely from the wind saving 10-20g of drag. Cervelo claims that if your bike is not equipped with Di2, the Hidden Pocket can be used for stashing accessories or flat kits, though it’s practicality is difficult to gauge without actually using it as such.

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

Another redesigned zone for this bike is the seat tube area just under the top tube.  At almost twice the length of the P4 (and still UCI compliant!) this area is extremely aerodynamic.  Based on their extensive wind tunnel testing of the bike, Cervelo claims the new design is capable of saving 6-11 watts or roughly 30 seconds over the course of a 40 kilometer time trial.

I should also mention that this frame is going to be compatible with almost anything available aftermarket industry wide.  The P5 frame works with any type of stock brake, aerobar, stem, or wheelset.  With the new geometry it will also fit a much wider range of athletes than some other super aero TT bikes available.

Sizing wise, both versions of the P5 will be available in 6 different sizes, ranging from 48 to 61cm, with only the smallest 48cm size rolling on 650c’s. Like many other TT/Tri bikes based on its use, the P5 can be set up with either a 75 or 79 degree seat tube angle.

 

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

The new aerobar being made by 3T that will come on the non-UCI versions of this bike are not only extremely adjustable, they also look the part.

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

While Cervelo is responsible for the CFD and wind tunnel testing of the new aerobar system, the bars themselves are being made by 3T. Named the ADURO, the new bars will be coming on all of the non-UCI P5 options.  Due to exposed cables adding up to 40 grams of drag when compared to internal cables, the P5′s bar system hides 100% of the cables and housing, while still remaining incredibly adjustable for many different rider styles and fit requirements with interchangeable arm rests, risers, and telescoping extentions.  The ADURO aero bars will have three macro height adjustments (40, 60 & 105mm) along with smaller 5mm micro adjustments.  Stem length will be set at 90mm, and have an additional 50mm of fore/aft adjustment for just about any reach specification needed.  In addition to a super clean design and simple adjustment options, the bar will also come stock with a horizontal water bottle mounting point, and an integrated computer mount. Aftermarket availability hasn’t been specified, although Cervelo is quick to point out that the ARDUROs fit a standard 1 1/8th steerer, and will fit all currently available brake levers and shifters.

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

Hydraulic integration has been a massive point of speculation recently.  It is confirmed that Magura is the new partner working with Cervelo to now have the world’s only fully integrated hydraulic brake system available on the road today.  Interestingly, Magura has gone with a center mounted brake which is the current road brake mounting standard. There have been some rumors floating around recently regarding a possible post mount standard for hydro TT brakes which if it exists, Magura chose not to use. Obviously, this is a benefit for current tri bike owners who may want to retrofit their bikes with the RT8TTs.

The Magura RT8TT brakes weigh a svelte 495g (calipers, hydro hose, fluid, levers and all mounting hardware),  which is by far the lightest brake configuration available for any road bike.  A very interesting piece of trivia is that one meter of hydraulic hose WITH oil weighs 5g, while the same length of brake housing and cable is 70g.  The RT8TT system is a closed system, much like the original Magura HS 33 brakes.

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

Along with the increased modulation and power comes further aero benefits.  The Magura front brake even without the aero cover found on the non-UCI P5 is still about twice as fast as a standard brake caliper (wind tunnel and CFD tested.)  This brake setup will fit all wheel sizes and handlebar diameters, and will be available for aftermarket sale for your TT/Tri bike sometime later this year.  Unfortunately right now, there is no option to use the Di2 brake/shift lever with the Magura RT8TT system, though you can of course still use Di2 aero bar shifters.

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

In addition to technology revisions on the frame, aerobar, and brake system come well thought out accessory and storage options.  As mentioned above, the bike will come stock with a bottle positioned horizontally between the aero bars.  The hidden pocket will be a place to stash a flat tire kit, or your Di2 battery.  There are two bolts that exist on the top tube behind the steerer tube to install a bolt on bento box offered by a few aftermarket companies.  Xlab has already created a new wing system to work with the updated seatpost design.  All of the new storage and hydration features have been designed and positioned to reduce drag and increase simplicity.

2012 Cervelo P5 Triathlon Bike actual photos details and specs with Magura RT8TT hydraulic road brakes and Shimano Di2 electronic shifting

Keep a look out for a first ride review post.  We will be taking this bike out for a few hours this week, and will be able to get a good idea how it feels on a longer ride.  Considering how windy it is here in the Canary Islands, this setting is going to be a great place to find out how this bike will ride in extremely heavy crosswinds and headwinds. The P5 should be available to consumers starting this march with pricing as stated below:

  • TT Frameset – $4500 – UCI fork, no aerobar
  • Tri Frameset – $6500 – with 3T Aduro bar & non-UCI fork
  • DA Complete – $6000 – with complete Dura-Ace mechanical group, standard aero bar & UCI fork
  • Di2 Complete – $10,000 – with complete Di2 group, non-UCI fork & 3T Aduro bar

Comments

A. - 01/18/12 - 12:16am

“The Magura front brake even without the aero cover found on the non-UCI P5 is still about twice as fast as a standard brake caliper”

Quite the claim… a brake that’s twice as fast. That’s just what a triathlete needs.

It’s a hot looking bike, but it would be better for the end user if a company that has such consistently poor quality control would focus on improving durability, even if only by that same minute amount that they are trying to improve upon aerodynamics.

Morganj - 01/18/12 - 12:41am

Wow! That is pretty awesome!

MTB - 01/18/12 - 12:49am

And, the pricing is not bad at all. 6K for the complete DA bike.
Wonder if the Magura brakes will come with that bike set up.

This is definitely my next purchase.

jack tasak - 01/18/12 - 6:20am

My dear God, what a machine :o MTB – it will surely come with that new magura. i cannot imagine anything else mounted in that frame ;d

Dan - 01/18/12 - 8:03am

the most beautiful and most technical advanced Cervelo bike in last years

artray - 01/18/12 - 8:22am

“simple look as well as incredible sex appeal” This is a bike we are talking about .I just dont see it . I’d rather be with a woman but each to there own .

MTB - 01/18/12 - 9:59am

A.,

“consistently poor quality control”?
I can’t find w/ on-line search what you are referring to, except for some minor paint “bubbles”.

Brad - 01/18/12 - 10:59am

god that thing is hideous. It looks like the front end of the Scott Plasma mated to a Trek Speed Concept ass end with a bunch of other tom foolery after that. Integrated Hydration in the frame ala the new Shiv…Not an original thing here except for hydraulic rim crushers. I remember those things…I hope they are better this go around.

h2ofuel - 01/18/12 - 2:54pm

@Brad You’re right. Everyone knows that the true key to going fast is in how cool one looks, not a bunch of silly shapes, angles, and complex numbers on a piece of paper.

Terrier - 01/18/12 - 4:50pm

I’d argue going fast has more to do with the engine than the bike. To your point though, if triathletes were worried about looking cool instead of speed, the rest of us wouldn’t be able to laugh at their mankinis, so to hell with that jazz.

roddw - 01/18/12 - 4:58pm

Wonder if Shimano remote shifters could be setup to work on the base bar, since DI2 brake levers/shifters are not compatible with the Magura brakes?

Mallory - 01/18/12 - 6:02pm

@Brad….there is no integrated hydration system on the P5 (ala the Tri Shiv) Don’t know where you imagined that… Also…have you ever seen a Speed Concept (??)…the rear end looks nothing like the SC…if anything it has more in common visually to the stated Plasma

@roddw…yes, you technically can graft the Shimano satellite Di2 buttons on the cowhorns…but it will require some creativity (and possibly warranty voiding mods) to get the satellite wiring to the harness…since there are no access holes for the wiring…

razmaspaz - 01/20/12 - 2:50pm

I’ve gotta say this is an impressive bike, but to choose to build a Di2 bike and not account for shifting on the bullhorns? Lame. To choose hydraulic braking over electronic shifting misses the tri market in my mind.

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