Ergon Makes Performance Grips More Durable, Enviromentally Friendlier

2012 Ergon GP1 biokork ergonomic bicycle grips get more durable and environmentally friendly

Ergon has updated their Comfort Performance grips for 2012, improving the durability of the compound and making the products and packaging a little more earth friendly.

With all of the design, testing and engineering done in-house in Germany, Ergon keeps a close eye on the total impact of their products. That includes how long they last since the more grips you go through, the more packaging and materials get consumed. And those have to go somewhere.

Over the course of 2011, Ergon developed new compounds, finding a German producer for the new rubber compound used for parts of the BioKork grips shown above and their GP2′s shown after the break. Ergon USA VP Jeffrey Neal says the compound is of a much higher quality, yielding a rubber that meets food safety purity standards and automotive UV standards. It’s contaminant free, using medically approved “white oil” only.

2012 Ergon GP2 performance ergonomic bicycle grips get more durable and environmentally friendly

BTW, the cork for the BioKork grips comes from Portugal. The materials for grips are shipped to their factory in Taiwan for molding and packaging. Their pedals are about 40% made in Germany.

Comments

Robin2 - 11/09/11 - 7:57pm

Another useless gimmick foisted on the cycling public. Re-designing grips is like re-designing the wheel. Stop. If you’re having hand numbness, you’re not fitted properly on your rig.

dgaddis - 11/10/11 - 10:46am

Whatever dude. Go to an endurance race and look at how many people are using Ergons. There’s a reason.

iunderhill - 11/10/11 - 7:11pm

Numbness? As usual, reflexive curmudgeonry gets you nowhere – you’re so caught up in “These companies…how DARE they sell PRODUCTS to CONSUMERS!” blathering that you miss the point of the grips. It’s about improving comfort, not serving as a snake oil cure-all nerve-damaging pain. The contour on the back side of the grip provides a platform for the heel of the hand to rest upon, which doesn’t exist with regular rounded grips. There are a fair number of contoured grips on the market and the success of them for each rider is going to depend upon that rider’s hand size, angle of shift/brake levers, and personal preference.

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