Oregon Manifest – Urban Bicycle Design Collabos from Rock Lobster, Signal & SyCip

2011 Oregeon Manifest Constructers Challenge urban bike design collaboration with Ziba and Signal Cycles with convertible cargo sidecar bike

For this year’s Oregon Manifest Constructor’s Challenge, an additional category was opened that paired design houses with builders. The point of the contest is to reimagine the bicycle into the ultimate utilitarian commuter bike, something that could replace the car and make transportation and errand running easy and fun. Three collaborations were introduced: IDEO x Rock Lobster, FuseProject x SyCip and Ziba Design x Signal Cycles – and all three came up with some very interesting cargo/commuter bicycles.

Above is the Ziba-Signal Cycles Fremont, a step through mixte with integrated rear rack that folds open to create a sidecar. They’ve already filed a patent for the design, which allows for small cargo to be placed on the rack or larger cargo to ride shotgun. It includes folding, weatherproof pannier bags that open up into the large sacks shown here. They can easily go into and out of the store so you don’t need to decide between paper or plastic, and they’ll lock to the bike (and lock closed), so you can leave them on board for quick trips into and out of the coffee shop, etc.

Roll through the break for pics and more design conscious cycling goodness…

2011 Oregeon Manifest Constructors Challenge urban bike design collaboration with Ziba and Signal Cycles with convertible cargo sidecar bike

2011 Oregeon Manifest Constructors Challenge urban bike design collaboration with Ziba and Signal Cycles with convertible cargo sidecar bike

FUSEPROJECT x SYCIP DESIGN

2011 Oregeon Manifest Constructers Challenge urban bike design collaboration with Fuse Project and Sycip for a front three wheeler cargo bicycle

FuseProject, based in San Francisco, CA, paired up with nearby builder SyCip Design to create this three wheeled drifter. The concept started life as a sidehack ( <- watch the video at that link ) but morphed into a front trike for better stability. It also simplified the drivetrain layout. In a CNET article, Sycip says the steering requires flipping your balance against what you’d normally do, leaning away from the turn to keep the outside wheel planted. He also said it was incredibly fun on the gravel road downhills, drifting into and around the corners like crazy.

FuseProject, started by uber designer Yves Behar, also designed the Jawbone Jambox, which is what you see attached to the canvas stretched between the front triangle. He’s ordered several of these bikes for his office and for personal use, and this was the least expensive of the three collaboration bikes to produce, so perhaps we’ll actually see this one offered as-is from Sycip.

2011 Oregeon Manifest Constructers Challenge urban bike design collaboration with Fuse Project and Sycip for a front three wheeler cargo bicycle

Two of the design requirements are that the bikes contain front and rear lighting and an integrated lock. SyCip’s has a U-lock built into the frame so it can just roll directly up to a pole or bike rack and lock into it.

2011 Oregeon Manifest Constructers Challenge urban bike design collaboration with Fuse Project and Sycip for a front three wheeler cargo bicycle

IDEO x ROCK LOBSTER

2011 Oregeon Manifest Constructers Challenge urban bike design collaboration with IDEO and Rock Lobster for Faraday e-bike with hidden battery

The Constructor’s Challenge is about more than just building a bike. They also have to ride it. A lot. And carry cargo. Some of that riding is uphill, and given that all of these bikes are well more than 30lbs without cargo, IDEO and Rock Lobster had the brilliant idea of putting a motor on theirs. Called Faraday, the (unfortunately tall) e-bike hides its electronics well. The front hub is the motor, and the doctor’s-office-green thing stuck between the top tubes behind the seat tube is the battery.

2011 Oregeon Manifest Constructors Challenge urban bike design collaboration with IDEO and Rock Lobster for Faraday e-bike with hidden battery

The bike’s name is an homage to 19th century scientist Michael Faraday (not the Lost character) whose inventions led the way to electric motors. It’s pedal-assist, the 24-volt, 250-watt motor won’t carry you along on its own. It’s activated by the stealthy little thumb lever on the left grip.

2011 Oregeon Manifest Constructors Challenge urban bike design collaboration with IDEO and Rock Lobster for Faraday e-bike with hidden battery

Comments

Daniel Knighten - 09/26/11 - 12:24pm

I checked out the Oregon Manifest on Friday (I live in Portland) and was profoundly disappointed. Most of the bikes where basically art bikes rather than practical urban machines. The ones that where not art bikes would be unrealistically expensive if they where ever sold. I mean come-on, full Dura-Ace DI2 on on urban bike?

I did not see a single machine that beat a Trek Soho or similar as an urban bike or a Bakfiets for cargo. I mean, if I could afford it I would consider a Moot Commoter as an urban bike but there was very little on display that was even as practical as that.

Gillis - 09/26/11 - 12:58pm

I think the Ziba-Signal Cycles Fremont at the top of the page is the winner here. Although I do have doubts about the stability of the sidecar. The way it is attached seems like it might cause some cornering issues. But the accompanying bags look really nice and I like the brown/celeste color scheme. And surprisingly it’s the only one to use a belt drive.

The Fuse/Sycip is kinda trick but ultimately falls short for me. Those front “fenders” are a joke. I’m sure its fun as hell to ride though.

Ideo /Rock Lobster: what the hell were they thinking? You’ll need a 50″ inseam to stand over that thing. Putting a motor-hub and paint matched battery case on is not that difficult. The chainguard with chainlink cutouts is cool though. Overall I would have like to have seen better from this particular collaboration.

waikikiguy - 09/26/11 - 11:41pm

or you just use a bob+whatever? ohh i forgot this is all for show.

Scott - 09/29/11 - 8:05pm

Daniel, conceptual design is not for the realm of value, it is for the realm of concept. If we had to make everything affordable at it’s inception there would be nothing. Nay saying, however, is always free and therfore in plenty. What does your concept bike look like?

Rorschach - 09/30/11 - 1:00am

I think you’re all kinda’ missing the point…
A Magna mtn frame and a u lock is the ideal ‘urban bike’…it rolls and no one wants it. That’s not what this is about, right? Are they all perfect, or make perfect sense, probably not…but loosen up with the orthodoxy!

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