New Chainguides and Colored Chainrings, Sizes from e*Thirteen

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SEA OTTER CLASSIC 2010 – e*thirteen is releasing new colors and sizes for their chainrings, offering even and odd tooth rings in every size from 32 to 42 tooth. Prices range from $40 to $45.

For the chainguides, they’ve got two models that use their new stamped steel back plate.  The steel let’s them offer chainguides at lower price points without giving up much in performance by using the same guides and hardware as the higher end alloy-plated versions.

Check them out after the break…

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The SS+ (above) and the LS1 (below) use stamped steel plates that have extensive shaping.  They’re formed through several stamping processes that are highly controlled to prevent the warping or bending that can occur with cheap stamping processes.  Every time metal is stamped, it pushes material around and can cause unwanted bends.  e*thirteen’s process keeps everything in line to create a very stiff plate that’s less expensive than their machined alloy plates.  They say these models still weigh less than the high end models from their competitors.

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The LS1 has a replaceable bash guard, and both models feature detented adjustments to make it easier to dial in the chainline and keep things where you set them.  The guides on the SS+ and LS1 are the same material as their higher end models.

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Hardware is captive, meaning it stays the backplate when you remove the guides to install a chain or service the bike.  e*thirteen says this keeps small pieces from falling in the dirt or getting lost in the pit area, which was a big plus for the teams and mechanics they talk to.

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