Campy 11-speed Super Record hitting stores

After more than 20 years existing only as legend, Campagnola has respawned its fabled racing group, the Super Record.  Yes, there have been press releases out, but our LBS got an early set in and built up a Specialized Tarmac SL and it is freakin’ sweet. They weren’t about to let me take it out for a demo ride, so I’m working on getting Campy to let us do a full review.  In the meantime, here are some close up pics to wet your appetite…

Yes, you need an 11-speed Super Record chain.  As imagined, the spacing is extremely tight, but there’s what an 11 speed cassette looks like.  The 2009 Chorus and Record groups will also feature 11-speed. Read more for the rest of the pics…

Carbon cranks with ceramic bearings keep it light and smooth.  Campy’s CULT ceramic bearing technology on the Super-Record eliminates the need for grease by using an exclusive Cronitect steel for the races.  You can lube them with oil to reduce noise, but otherwise, nothing is apparently  needed to keep them running smooth for a very long time.

Each outer pin on the chain has “R11″ stamped in it, just so you know what you’re runnin’.  Campy says it’s been redesigned to be 20% stronger and shift even better.

The front derailleur, in concert with the micro-mechanical adjustments that the shifters provide, allow for all 11 gears to be used in both chain rings.  The cage is stiffer, resulting in crisper shifts than the ’08 10-speed.

The rear derailleur has been redesigned to be 150% stiffer than ’08 models, and has larger-diameter pulleys with ceramic bearings to keep shifts tight and the chain rolling smoothly.

While the attention seems to be paid mostly to the fact that there’s now an extra cog on the cassette, my opinion is the bulk of the technology and ergonomic efforts went into the shifters.  Resting your hands on them is exceedingly comfortable and positioning is intuitive and relaxed.  The new brake levers have a repositioned pivot and dual curves to make them easier to operate from both the hoods and the drops.  The rubber used on the hoods is softer where your palms are, and firmer where your fingers grip.  Additionally, they curve inward slightly, making them more tailored to a natural hand position than previous generations.

I didn’t get a picture of it, but the inside of the cassette is wickedly machined out.  It will most likely be a real pain to clean, but it looks trick and should be very light despite the add’l cog.  Campy claims its 180% stiffer torsionally.

Keep checking back, or hop on our mailing list to be notified of a full review.

Comments

bikegawd - 08/25/08 - 11:56am

Come on!!! How unnecessary is this? More is not necessarily better… it’s simply more!

Post a comment:

Comment sections can be a beautiful source of knowledge, conversation and comedy. They can also get pretty ugly, which is why we've updated our Comments Policy. If your comment isn't showing up or suddenly disappears, you might want to check it out.