With the triathlon world championships looming this weekend at the Ironman in Kona, Zipp is getting deep with their biomimicking Sawtooth profile and top-level Nest Speed Weaponry lab tech. Their newest addition – the Zipp 858 NSW – takes deep undulating carbon clincher rims and laces them to either rim or disc brake hubs for an aero race wheelset that Zipp says will excel in any conditions.

Zipp 858 NSW deep section carbon clincher road bike race wheels

Zipp 858 NSW aero deep section carbon clincher road bike race wheels rim brake Sawtooth humpback whale rim shape

Using the humpback-inspired Sawtooth profile debuted on the 454, Zipp claims that riders can benefit from the improved aerodynamics of the deeper section of the new 858 NSW in any wind conditions. With varying rim depth from 77-82mm, the claimed stability in variable winds makes these new wheels the ultimate choice for any type of competition, from traditional road racing to TTs and triathlon. In Zipp’s own words, “Faster than an 808. Rides like a 404.

Zipp 858 NSW aero deep section carbon clincher road bike race wheels disc brake rear wheel

Zipp even says that improvements in aerodynamic drag and crosswind stability are both even greater with the deeper Sawtooth rim, allowing cyclists to stay longer in their low aero tuck.

Tech details

Zipp 858 NSW aero deep section carbon clincher road bike race wheels disc brake ABLC dimples

The new wheels of course also include more NSW tech, like Zipp’s latest hexagonal ABLC variable dimple & ridged design which aims to break up the air against the rim for optimized aerodynamics. The rim brake wheels use their own rim with the latest silicon carbide Showstopper braking surface, while the disc rims have their own profile without any vestige of a brake track.

Zipp 858 NSW aero deep section carbon clincher road bike race wheels rim brake rim bed profile

At Eurobike just over a month ago Zipp transitioned most of their disc brake NSW & Firecrest carbon clincher wheels over to road tubeless. But beyond rim brake wheels not making the switch, neither did the Sawtooth 454. And unfortunately again the 858 NSW does not get tubeless compatibility.

Zipp 858 NSW aero deep section carbon clincher road bike race wheels rim brake Cognition hubs

At the center of the two wheelsets are Zipp’s latest NSW-only Cognition hubs, with their low-friction magnet Axial Clutch freewheel design (and SRAM XDR driver compatibility). The 858 NSW wheels stick with conventional Sapim CX-Ray straight pull bladed aero spokes and even external nipples for easier maintenance.

858 NSW disc brake carbon clincher wheels

Zipp 858 NSW aero deep section carbon clincher road bike race wheels disc brake wheelset

The disc brake wheels have a 17mm internal rim, 23.7mm max external, with depth varying from 77-82mm, and use centerlock rotors. With a 1834g total weight for the set (850g front/984g rear), the wheels get 24 spokes front & rear and 12mm thru-axle or QR compatibility. The 858 NSW DB wheels sell separately for $2000/2000€ for a front wheel/$2400€ for a rear and will be available in November 2017.

858 NSW rim brake carbon clincher wheels

Zipp 858 NSW aero deep section carbon clincher road bike race wheels rim brake wheelset

The rim brake wheels have the same 17mm internal rim width (and depths), but actually use different rim profiles front & rear, optimized for the different spoke lacing used. The more symmetric front wheel with its 18 radially laced spokes gets a slightly wider rim that maxes out at 24.4mm external, while the 24 spoke rear gets up to 23.7mm at its widest point. The rim brake wheelset weighs 1750g (808g front/942g rear) and retails for the same $2000€ front & $2400€ rear pricing, with Nov 2017 availability.

Zipp.com

7 COMMENTS

  1. The UCI better make some changes in their technical limitations soon, it seems like we’ve reached peak wheel and they’re just trying their hardest to ‘innovate’ at this point. Good on them, but man, they’re really searching for a smaller and smaller market with this stuff.

    • Yeah wheels haven’t really gotten much “faster” in the last decade. Aero performance with wider tires (more comfort, marginal rolling resistance gains) and braking have been improved but I would definitely not buy any of the latest and greatest wheels. As someone who likes to make very informed equipment decisions the value isn’t there.

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