If your idea of the perfect road ride involves just as much dirt as it does pavement, adventure bikes or ‘all-road’ bikes probably need no introduction. Fitted with bigger tires, more clearance in the frame and fork, plus more relaxed geometry to help you tackle the rough roads ahead. Something like the new Orbea Terra all-road machine. First shown as a prototype late last year, the Terra brings new life to an old name, one that used to be associated with their CX frameset. While Orbea still expects riders to be able to use the new Terra for CX racing, the bike it built with a more all-purpose slant with comfort over rough terrain a high priority. Sitting alongside the Orca and Avant, the new Terra is ready to take you on your next multi surface adventure…

Utilizing a carbon frame and fork, Orbea points out that the frame was designed to be as compliant as possible, while maintaining an efficient ride, all without the addition of frame inserts or elastomers. There aren’t any numbers provided, but they claim that small sections of the frame and fork are responsible for vibration absorption, while providing clearance for 700 x 40c tires (+5mm of clearance on either side). Using OMP (Orbea’s Monocoque Performance) carbon fiber, Orbea is surprisingly transparent with the frame and fork construction stating that they use a bladded molded frame with polyurethane headtube and bottom bracket inserts to provide wrinkle free carbon in the critical zones. They even go as far as stating that the frame uses 150-160 standard cut prepreg pieces with 5% high strength/high modulus and with at least 10mm of overlap, and preform the frame at least two hours before molding. The resulting frame comes in at a claimed 1190g for a painted small.

Feature wise, the Terra is equipped with almost every thing you could want from a modern adventure bike. Wheels use a 12 x 100 and 12 x 142mm thru axle front and rear, a PF30 bottom bracket shell allows for 1x or 2x drivetrain options and includes integrated chain security when not using a braze on type front derailleur. Internal cable routing is designed to cut down on rattles and the 27.2mm seatpost is designed to house an internal Di2 battery. Other details include an integrated, 1 1/8″- 1.5″ tapered headset and head tube, flat mount disc brakes, and full fender and rear rack mounts.

Orbea says that their Terra Geometry should work for CX, all day epics, or the occasional training day on the road, and features a longer wheel base, chainstays, lower BB, and higher stack with a shorter reach.

Offered in multiple builds, prices range from $2,999 to $4,999 and include the option for the MyO custom paint program allowing you to tune the aesthetics to your personal taste.

orbea.com

12 COMMENTS

  1. This is what I don’t understand: anyone who has ridden a road bicycle knows the position in which you ride is atrocious. It’s much better on a regular hardtail mtb. Why they keep marketing back-breaking monstrosities for “all day epic rides”?

    Beats me.

    • Wow, 70.5 head angle combined with 51mm rake! That’s about as slack as I’ve ever seen. Be interesting to see what the handling is like.

  2. For rides of any distance I find the position(s) on my cross bike far more comfortable than my hardtail. The drop bars are especially easier on my wrists.

  3. Love the lines on the new Orbea bikes, nothing too stupid designwise just for the sake of sales, nice looking geometry and I really like how they kept the bigger bikes same HA as the smaller sizes. probably cause they only have one fork offset so the trail numbers are consistent across the size range, but it’s nice to see taller riders getting same stable handling with slacker HA.
    I spent a lot of time over the weekend on my atrocious gravel type geometry, felt fine. My bar position is just high enough to ride the drops a lot, which is nice on the dirt roads and make the tops of my bars high enough to sit very upright for the long winding roads with no headwinds. Not sure, but almost feels more upright than my 29r XC bike…

What do you think?