Kickstarter: ShockWiz Brings Automated Suspension Tuning to Mountain Bikes

ShockWiz Mounted

Like no other hobby, mountain biking is the melding of man and machine. It’s why we spend outrageous sums of money on titanium hardware, and enormous amounts of time researching new technologies. The obsession and passion surrounding new frame models is often equaled or surpassed only by discussions on suspension (and where to drink post ride).

In order to help make suspension acquisition data readily available to armchair engineers and forum dwellers everywhere, Dusty Dynamics had launched a new Kickstarter campaign around their ShockWiz Automated Suspension Tuner.

ShockWiz Mounted 2

The small apparatus weights 45g and mounts to any air shock or fork.

ShockWiz Smartphone AP Screenshot

Once connected to your suspension via a Schrader valve, the ShockWiz sends feedback to your phone regarding pressure/sag/etc…

ShockWiz Smartphone Ap

From there, you can enter your weight and riding style to generate tuning recommendations. As you ride, the system will sample your spring pressure at 100hz, evaluate the suspension characteristics, and spit out recommendations.

The system can also generate a shock health score, to help indicate how well your suspension is setup.

An additional feature, which doesn’t influence shock tuning (but is apparenlty good for settling bets) is the system’s ability to record air time.

Currently the ShockWiz has 59 backers and is $54,166 shy of reaching it’s goal. If you’re interested, the super early bird price is $259, and there are still 31 days left in the Kickstarter Campaign.

Would you be interested in trying this device out, or is this just too geeky?

Comments

14 thoughts on “Kickstarter: ShockWiz Brings Automated Suspension Tuning to Mountain Bikes

  1. So a typical ride in the near future is like: 20min adjusting Strava/garmin/selfie on facebook/setting up the personal drone to follow you/adjusting the dropper post…now selecting the fork settings…what else? hummm…can someone remind me why we ride bikes?

  2. @me
    Because we can afford fancy material goods instead of people that can’t afford anything and have to run barefoot to exercise and get places.

  3. Every singel PM just got auth to buy this. If it works like advertized/we are imagining. Well done. I want one too.

  4. Just backed them at the $1.00 level. I want more info level. I know I am not getting the best out of my fork and rear linkages. bummed that, they recommend the whiz, with front and back shocks together…
    Star

  5. (deleted)

    Back on topic:
    I think this is a great idea and have contemplated something very similar. I just lack the engineering and programming abilities to make it happen.

    I am planning to split the cost of a double setup with a friend and we can run a tuning service in our area to offset the cost.

  6. Prob didn’t sleep well when I placed that first comment…sorry! KUDOS for the people making the difference trying to create this device…and yes…@JP, dropper posts are very useful indeed!
    I see racers getting good benefit from this!…and well people that can afford everything and go for a weekend, don’t need to be justified how they spend their money! Cheers

  7. Weird idea … but with all these tiny accelerometers, why can’t there be cheap auto lockouts. For that matter, why can’t we use a power meter to detect when your power your putting in the drivetrain and stiffen up the suspension accordingly.

    Shocks could get so much smarter.

  8. @surlywill – that would be too easy. With that kind of business model they could have any planned obsolescence!

  9. did I get the point?
    shock health? who say, that their shock health is the right one for me?
    sorry to say, but to adjust a shock is not objective. NEVER.
    ask 10 pro’s and all of them have another setup for the same track.

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