Search results for: "project 24.2"

Project 24.2 Initial Review: Mavic’s well-cut Club winter gloves

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A well-considered cut makes Mavic’s Club glove a good winter mountain biking choice.

Mavic’s Club winter glove is built using multi-layer ski glove-type construction, with a Cold Ride windproof back, Clarino synthetic suede palm, and fleecy insulating interior. The cuff-to-fingertip reflective print manages to balance good visibility with (to my eyes) good looks. There’s even a bit of absorbent material on the thumb to catch the drips.  Hot stuff?  Read on to find out…

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Project 24.2 Review: Ergon’s GA1 Leichtbau grip and HA2 glove

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With my half of 24 hours worth of racing- to say nothing of hundreds of hours of training- on the table, I was excited when Ergon’s Jeff Kerkove suggested that we give the company’s technically-oriented GA1 Leichtbau ergonomic grips and matching HA2 gloves a try.  With Jeff himself no stranger to long rides and given the grips’ popularity among New Mexico’s endurance racing set, I though that Ergon might be on to something.  Weird or wonderful?  Pass the break and start another lap to find out!

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Project 24.2 Review: Road ID’s tenacious Firefly Supernova safety light

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Along with the Elite wrist band reviewed last month, the good people at Road ID sent out their new Supernova safety light to help us safely through a winter of training for 24-hour racing.  Claimed to be “the brightest, lightest, most durable security light in its class,” the Supernova is powered by two CR2032 batteries (the same sized used by many bike computers).  At 20g, Road ID’s little light comes in four lens colors (white, red, blue, and green) and is waterproof to three hundred feet.  Fortunately, all of its use so far has been above the surface.  Click more to find out where the Supernova is hot- and where it’s not so hot.

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Project 24.2 Review: Ritchey WCS Carbon 1-Bolt seatpost

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In order to meet the seatpost ideal of solidity, adjustability, and light weight, Ritchey have rethought their long-standing 1- and 2-bolt clamp designs. As others have learned (often the hard way), highly leveraged brittle hardened steel or titanium bolts are not always up to handling the forces generated by big riders and (especially on mountain bikes) hard landings. Ritchey’s new 1-Bolt seatpost design, seen here in its WCS Carbon version, presents a new take -the SideBinder- on saddle clamping. After several months on my single speed and our Project 24.2 race bike, it holds a lot of promise, with only a few minor considerations. Click through for more…

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Project 24.2: The finishing touches

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By the time that this post goes live, we’ll be well on our way to Tucson to compete in the Kona 24 Hours in the Old Pueblo.  Under the guidance of Tom Jones from JBV Coaching, our training has gone well- the intensity-focused workouts had me feeling a bit ragged, but the way in which we completed a 93mi training ride put my mind to rest: if we can keep eating, this 24-hour duo thing will be do-able.

Hit the jump for more pictures and equipment updates…

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Project 24.2 Review: Looking Tremendous and Staying Warm in Louis Garneau’s Enduro Bib Knikers 2

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What is better than putting on your stretchy pants on a crisp winter morning knowing you are going to be looking good (i.e. like an awkward and weird cyclist) as you take your warm up spin through the local college campus to check out the sights? Not much else ’cause even if the laymen student doesn’t appreciate your fancy stretchy pants, you know that your Louis Garneau’s Enduro Bib Knickers 2 are hugging your buns keeping things warm and comfy. Hopscotch your way across the break to get the specifics on the knickers.

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Project 24.2 Initial Review: Swiftwick Pursiuit merino socks and Performance Sleeves

As we enter the standard January drought conditions here in the Southwest, it is finally time to get out on the trails again. We have to enjoy the brisk temperatures and warm sun as we prepare our legs for next month’s 24 Hours in the Old Pueblo.  This has allowed us to spend a little time on the trail/road/snow in our fancy new US-made socks and arm warmers from Swiftwick. Jump past the break to see how things are shaping up.

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Project 24.2 initial review: JBV Coaching by Tom Jones

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After a number of years essentially ‘winging it’ when it came to training for 24 Hours in the Old Pueblo, it hadn’t really occurred to me to engage a coach.  Much like bike fit, if -like me- you’ve been riding and even racing for over 20 years, you just kind of know how to train, right?

A trick question, obviously.  When my race partner Alex suggested talking to Tom Jones at JBV Coaching, I was intrigued- and a bit worried.  After all, I ride because cycling is fun.  And training -actually training- didn’t sound like much fun at all.  Our first meeting with Tom put most of my fears to rest- in addition to an impressive resume as a coach, racer, physicist, and mechanic, Tom is also a nice guy. While we won’t give away any of his trade secrets, go beyond the fold to find out what we’ve learned so far…

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Project 24.2 Initial Review: Ritchey WCS Carbon Matrix C260 stem

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For the most part, it’s hard to get too excited about stems.  If they do their job well (and most do), they’re essentially unnoticeable.  Of course, if they don’t they’re ugly, flexy, or (if they do their job especially poorly) fail catastrophically.  That said, when we posted early word of Ritchey’s new C260 line of stems this fall, people got pretty excited.

Owing to its 260 degree clamp and gently curved 3-bolt steerer clamp, Ritchey’s WCS C260 stem tests 3-4x stronger in its aluminum form than any previous Ritchey stem- while being 30% stiffer than the preceding 4Axis design.  Throw a unidirectional carbon wrap over the same basic design and weight goes up by ~15g (to an actual 110g in our 90mm size) and stiffness by an additional 16%.  Oh, and it’s prettier, too.  After a couple of months on my Project 1.1 single speed and Project 24.2 race bike, has the C260 lived up to its light/strong/sexy billing?  Hit the jump to find out…

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