Search results for: "project 24"

Project 24.2 Review: WTB Nano TCS 2.1 XC tires and WeirWolf grips

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Along with the Valcon Carbon saddle reviewed here, WTB sent out some race rubber in the form of Nano TCS tires and WeirWolf grips to complete my Tomac Supermatic  race bike.  Out of the WTB line, the WeirWolf grip (which shares its knobby pattern with the Mark Weir signature tire of the same name) looked set to provide good control and grip to tired hands.  The tubeless compatible (with sealant) Nano TCS tire looked like a fast tire with enough of a casing to avoid late-night cactus-induced flats.  Were they up to the task?  You know where our secrets go…

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Project 24.2 Review: Pearl Izumi’s Transfer Short- and Long-Sleeve baselayers

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Part of Pearl Izumi’s top-tier P.R.O. series of clothing, the Transfer Short Sleeve and Long Sleeve baselayers are the company’s current state of the baselayer art.  Built of the company’s midweight Transfer fabric, the baselayers feature Cocona’s Minerale™ technology.  Minerale™ is claimed to provide “optimal moisture transfer, dry time, and odor absorbance” derived, no joke, from volcanic minerals.  That’s some pretty heady stuff.  Magic fabric and a close-to-body fit should make the Transfer baselayers sublime in use- are they?

Project 24.2 Review: CamelBak’s low-slung Charge LR hydration pack

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With last year’s superlight adventure racing-oriented Octane LR pack, CamelBak turned their long-time hydration pack design on its side.  With a dedicated 70oz (2L) Antidote sitting across the wearer’s hips, the heaviest part of the wearer’s load could be carried low, relieving the shoulders and lowering the rider’s center of gravity.  For 2012, CamelBak took the Octane LR’s design and tweaked it a bit for the mountain bikers who were buying the “lumbar reservoir” pack, resulting in the Charge LR tested here.  How has CamelBak’s new approach fared on the trail?  Answers after the jump…

Project 24.2 Review: Magura’s great feeling MT6 disc brakes

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When they were announced last summer, Magura’s MT disc brake line grabbed a lot of attention.  With strikingly light weights and what was claimed to be the industry’s first carbon fiber master cylinder, gram freaks everywhere were at attention.  While the $400/wheel MT8s got most of the press, keen-eyed spec readers quickly noticed that by trading the carbon lever and bar clamp for aluminum and leaving a bit more material in the caliper, the MT6 gained a mere 32g per wheel, added a bit of power-enhancing stiffness- and more importantly saved $200 per set.

It was with these more-than-worthwhile compromises in mind that I bolted a set of MT6s to our Project 24.2 bike.  Four months and over a thousand miles later, I’ve been impressed with Magura’s latest.  Read on to find out why…

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Project 24.2 Review: Finding the sweet spot with WTB’s Valcon Carbon saddle

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The week before the our last big pre-24 hour race ride, a slick looking WTB Valcon Carbon saddle with carbon rails floated into the Bikerumor workshop for testing. Not many of us are dumb enough to put a brand new saddle on our bikes before we venture out on a big day. Luckily I commonly ignore common sense in order to check out new cool bike gear. I quickly mounted the saddle to my Tomac Supermatic race machine for our 92 mile shakedown ride. Click away to find out how the superlight perch fared on the 7.5 hour mountain bike shakedown ride- as well as at the subsequent 24 hrs In the Old Pueblo.

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Project 24.2 Review: Louis Garneau’s barely there Carbon Lazer Shorts

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Though the brand doesn’t seem to get the respect that its high-end products deserve, I’ve long been a fan of Louis Garneau’s shorts. Always well made and in my opinion quite comfortable, Garneau’s shorts show excellent attention to detail. A 12 panel short (also available in a bib short verison) that makes use of the company’s antibacterial “most comfortable,” “all day on the saddle” Airgel Chamois, the Carbon Lazer seemed like it would be a great choice for 24 hour training and racing.

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Project 24.2 Initial Review: Giro Ambient 2 cool weather gloves

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Looking for some gloves that I could leave in my mountain pack (and to save my white Castelli Chiro WS gloves from the indignities of off-road use), this winter I set out to find a new pair of cold weather mountain bike gloves. At my local REI, I stumbled on a pair of Giro’s Ambient 2s- and the fit was enough to convince me to give them a go. Consisting of a water- and wind-resistant softshell back, strategically padded synthetic Clarino palm, and funk-fighting X-Static fleece lining, the Ambient 2s seemed like a good choice for mountain biking in 30-45 degree weather. Were they? Hit the jump to find out.

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Bikerumor Project 24.2 Review: DannyShane Tartan Race jerseys

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taking training more seriously

Given our intention to take our 24 Hours in the Old Pueblo training and racing a bit more seriously this year, it was only appropriate that Alex and I come up with a team kit.  Balancing the ability to stand out on the race course with the desire need to look good, can be hard- and we racked our brains for the perfect jerseys.  Eventually, a bell went off:  what about DannyShane?  Manufacturers of one of my favorite jerseys ever, DannyShane is a Texas-based company that makes high-end, environmentally-aware cycling gear.  With a pair of the company’s Tartan Race jerseys- in Tinsley green and Bellam blue- Alex and I would stand out on the race course, be identifiable as a team.  And stay sexy.  What about performance, you ask?  Take the trip past the break to find out!

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Project 24.2 Review: Rocky Mountain’s Element 70 MSL: the ultimate stage racer?

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When Rocky Mountain offered to send an Element 70 MSL frame over the border for our Project 24.2 24 hour race frame, I was excited.  Who wouldn’t be excited by the opportunity to spend several months on a full carbon 120mm XC frame designed and tuned with input from Geoff Kabush and Andreas Hestler?  Then it landed.  The frame’s details really have to be seen to be appreciated, from the sculpted carbon swing link to the custom pewter anodized hardware and chain catcher.  “Sub-5lb” usually means that a frame is a hair (maybe even a shade) under 5lb.  On the scale, the Element 70 MSL came in at 4.75lb.  Now I was really excited: this was going to be fun.

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