Posts in the category Triathlon

EB14: Haero Carbon Makes World’s Lightest Aero Handlebars

haero-carbon-H253-ultralight-composite-aero-handlebars-extensions

German brand Haero Carbon is part of a family of companies that specializes in mold and die production, making carbon parts for the automotive industry alongside really lightweight bike parts. They’re all 100% carbon, and they’re all 100% made in Germany.

The headliner for the brand is their H.253, a base bar and extensions combo that comes in at just 340g ready to ride. The base bar is 400mm wide and has open, ergonomic ends ready for brake lever insertion. It comes in at just 205g on its own. The center has integrated mounts for their extensions, letting you slide them in and out to fit. The back side of those slots feeds the wires or cables through to the frame.

More details and a unique take on road (and mountain!) bars below…

READ MORE ->

IB14: Falco V Triathlon Bike Mutes Graphics But Keeps Its Edge, More

2015 Falco V Wing carbon fiber triathlon bike

Last year, Falco had just launched the V Wing bike with a very Tron-inspired paint scheme. This year, the paint was toned down a bit and the frame refined, but nothing about it was any less sharp.

Using a v-shaped “wing” frame design, it eliminates the seat tube and seatstays to reduce drag. The numbers, weights and pricing are all in that link above, but here’s the basics: 1700g frame, 550g fork, NACA 6-series tube shape profiles and it was designed in conjunction with four different universities and facilities that the military used to design fighter jets. Hence the look.

READ MORE ->

IB14: Blue Competition Cycles Unveils All-New Axino Lightweight, Aero Road Bike – Plus New Wheels & More

2015 Blue Axino lightweight aero road bike

Blue Competition Cycles has seen turbulent times of late. They changed ownership in December 2012 when they were sold to a group of investors. In the middle of 2013, the main investor, um, well, let’s just say they had to close their doors at the end of last year. Then, on January 1, 2014, the factory that had been making their bikes bought out the remaining investors and took full ownership. Daniel Stallings, Blue’s Sales Manager, says that’s put them on the best financial footing they’ve ever had and they have now moved through virtually all of the 2014 inventory. That means it’s time to bring in the 2015 inventory and really kick things off again.

The bikes coming in now are all freshly spec’d even though most models carry over with existing frames. The Triad and AC1 carbon frames are unchanged, but spec is updated. The Axino (above) used to be their premium race bike but had left the line over the past few years. For 2015, it returns as their lightest bike they’ve ever made, and it gets extensive aero shaping and plenty of attention paid to comfort. In their words, it’s a “super fast, super comfortable all day race bike.”

The frames are exactly the same for both the SL and EX and come in at just 850g. The only difference is spec, with the SL getting a full Dura-Ace mechanical group and the EX is Ultegra mechanical with FSA cranks.

Their house brand Aerus component line has had cockpit parts for years, but their factory has made wheels for quite some time, too. So, it’s only natural they’d start making their own hoops to offer lighter, better wheels on all their bikes without jacking up the prices…

READ MORE ->

Neugent Cycling Spins Away From Neuvation, Launches High-End & Hand-Built Eponymous Brand

Neugent 50mm Carbon Clinchers

John Neugent has been in the bike industry forever. Maybe not literally, but longer than the vast majority of people currently working, and he has developed a really unique way of creating product and looking at what is happening. John started Neuvation wheels in 2002, and was the owner of the value-based wheelset company that had a loyal, yet small following. John shut the doors to Neuvation in early 2014, but is already back with a new approach to bringing high-value wheels to the cycling industry.

There are no minced words when John speaks about his company, or how the industry works.  It is refreshing and honest, something he says is what creates his loyal followings.  There are a lot of people out there who just want to ride a bike, and not sift through the clutter, and John speaks directly to them, both literally with his popular newsletter, and through the products he is bringing with his new company, Neugent Cycling.

We recently caught up to John to hear his thoughts on starting something new, and where he thinks the industry is doing things right or wrong…

READ MORE ->

IB14: Null Winds Reinvents the Aero Spoke

Null Winds AeroTaper aero bicycle spoke

Earlier this year, Null Winds introduced their upper wheel fairing concept to block wind from the top section of spokes that typically push into the wind, creating multiples of drag compared to other parts of the bike. Aesthetically that device left quite a bit to be desired, but it looks like their new AeroTaper spoke could be just the solution.

The design works like this: A round spoke profile is used closer to the hub where the spoke is moving slower in relation to the wind. Because they’re round, they don’t impose as much penalty in a cross wind and have minimal aerodynamic penalty for the headwind. Closer to the rim, where the spokes are moving relatively faster, it flattens out to create an aero shape where they need to slice through a head wind better. Thus, an optimized cross sectional profile.

It’s not dissimilar to the idea of deep section aero rims, and you’ve got plenty of choices in rim depths to suit conditions. Likewise, Null Winds founder Garth Magee says they’ll have different taper depths to suit varying degrees of cross winds. No, you won’t rebuild your wheel every time. Rather, you’ll have a rim that you really like and have several different wheels built with different AeroTaper spokes and choose according to the day’s conditions.

READ MORE ->

All-New Diamondback Serios Triathlon Bike Proves Thinner Isn’t Always Faster

2015-diamondback-serios-tt-triathlon-bike

Teased just before all the top triathletes headed to Kona for Ironman World Championships, the new Diamondback Serios slipped some very interesting frame shapes in and out of focus with a short video. Now, we’ve got a very in-focus look at one of the sharpest looking tri bikes in recent memory and some Q&A with DB’s product manager to make sense of it all.

The story is they started with thinner and thinner tubes, thinking a more waif-like structure would slice through the air quicker and easier. What they found was some cross sections could be wider and provide better aerodynamics. And wider was better when it came to the range of riders it could fit, too. The project is a collaboration between Diamondback, HED Cycling and Kevin Quan Studios. The result is a wild looking TT/Triathlon bike that’s UCI legal and fits pros and age groupers both short and tall.

Here’s how they did it…

READ MORE ->

IB14: ISM Pads Their Saddles, Adds Triathlon Features & Recreation Models

ISM-PN1-1-and-PR2-0-triathlon-comfort-saddles

The Adamo Attack is ISM’s most popular road saddle, but some riders wanted something cushier. The new PN1.1 uses same shape but gets more padding and switches from titanium rails to steel. PN stands for Performance Narrow, and the PN1.1 will retail for $149.95. Width is 110mm, length is 270mm.

Not shown, the PN2.0 is a new triathlon version that gets a hook under the rear of the shell to hold the the bike in a ready-to-go position in transition racks. It gets the thinner, firmer padding of the Attack, making it more of a racer’s saddle.

PR is their Performance Recreation line. Shapes are similar to others but with more and softer padding. That’s what’s new, but we’ve got a look at Michellie Jones’ custom Felt race bike after the break…

READ MORE ->

First Impressions & Actual Weights: Recon’s 161g Titanium 11-Speed Road Cassette

Recon Titanium road bike cassette actual weight and early review

After testing the 120g alloy Recon race day cassette, we sent the link to Fair Wheel Bikes, not quite sure how they’d take it. After all, I snapped more than one tooth off that one and relegated it to use on the trainer. Fortunately, they appreciated the honesty and said it sounded about right, then offered up the more durable titanium version for review.

And here we are. Also made by Recon, the 6AL/4V titanium model uses two 3-cog clusters on the big end of the cassette -the largest of which sits on an alloy carrier- followed by individual cogs and spacer rings for the remainder. The 11-tooth cog is made from steel. It’s available in silver and gold, and the price is a whopping $320.

Here’s how that compares to SRAM, Shimano and Campy…

READ MORE ->

IB14: RPM2 Power Meter Shoe Insole Inserts Measure Force Everywhere

RPM2 cycling power meter shoe insole insert

While PowerTap may have experimented with insole-based power meters, RPM2 put their foot down and stepped into production.

They make versions for both cycling and running as well as a combo unit for triathlon/multisport use, and the cycling features make it fairly unique among power meter options. Garmin’s recent software update for its Vector pedals added a simple foot pressure balance measurement, showing if you were putting more pressure on the inside or outside edges of the pedal. Presumably, this data let you know if you’re feet could be better centered over the pedal for more efficient power transfer.

RPM2 takes this a step further (or closer?) by measuring both left/right and fore/after pressure, letting you see exactly where your feet are pressing the hardest against your shoe’s sole. This provides more specific and exact data that can be used to correct cleat placement, fit and alignment.

Of course, it also provides standard total power output for each leg, along with cadence and where in your pedal stroke your power is being applied…

READ MORE ->