Posts in the category Cyclocross

NAHBS 2015: Lundbeck Cycles Honors Swedish Heritage with Stunning Cross/Gravel Build

Lundbeck steel cycles cross bike  (14)

I may be a bit biased since Max Lundbeck is from my hometown, but he also builds some incredible bikes. This year, Max focused mainly on creating a cross bike that could double as a gravel bike or commuter rig thanks to small sacrifices in chainstay length. The result is a beautiful lugged frame with disc brakes, full fender eyelets, and depending on the frame either a standard seatpost or an integrated mast.

The real stunner was Max’s personal bike which plays off his family’s Swedish heritage and has an amazingly personalized paint job…

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NAHBS 2015: New Builder, Mars Cycles

mars-cycles--handbuilt-steel-cyclocross-bike-nahbs201501

Casey Sussman is the man from Mars Cycles of Oakland, California, a small frame building company specializing in custom fillet brazed and lugged steel racing frames. Casey has been building for a couple of years, his bikes proven at events like the Red Hook Criterium in Brooklyn and more, and now he can add a People’s Choice award for NAHBS 2015 to his accolades… READ MORE ->

NAHBS 2015: Boo hollows out bamboo for new, lighter race-ready gravel grinder & more!

Boo Bicycles SLG carbon and bamboo race-ready gravel road bike

Boo Bicycles has been making carbon fiber-and-bamboo bicycles for years now, but they keep refining the process. The latest iteration becomes the new premium SL offering, which not only drops weight from the frames, but makes them stiffer and stronger, too.

Above is the new SLG top-level gravel road bike, and this one’s built for Boo’s Nick Frey to race at this year’s Dirty Kanza and Crusher in the Tushars.

The upgrade is a new way of forming the top and downtubes. On their normal tubes, they hollow out the bamboo. On these, they hollow it out even more, making it lighter, then an S2 fiberglass load dispersion material is placed on the inside of the bamboo tubes and is cured while under compression from the inside. The result is a tube that’s much more impact resistant. Frey told us there tends to be a lot of downtube damage on composite frames in events like the Dirty Kanza, coming from really sharp gravel flying off the front wheel. Frey says they took a normal bamboo tube and smashed it on a table corner and it cracked, but repeated blows with the new S2-enhanced tubes didn’t show any damage.

But those aren’t the only changes growing on this bike…

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Shimano Updates Entry Level 11 Speed Wheels with the RS330

 Shimano_30mm_aluminum_clincher_rear_wheel_black_WH-RS330

Shimano continues to work on refining and expanding their affordable road wheel options by introducing a new 30mm deep profile aluminum clincher wheelset that brings some of their tech and aero benefits from higher-end wheels into their everyman Road Sport training wheels. The RS330 replaces the RS31 wheelset, adding one more spoke in the rear with an optimized lacing pattern to build a stronger more durable wheel. Their goal was to complete their 11-speed offerings with a low-cost alternative balancing rigidity, durability, and lightweight for everyday riding.

Roll past the jump to see where it fits in their aluminum road line up, as well as for estimated pricing and weights….

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NAHBS 2015: Silent Cycle’s gorgeously raw cyclocross bike & coffee delivering bakfiets

Silent Cycles steel cyclocross bike with raw finish

Silent Cycles, out of Chattanooga, TN, builds only with steel, and they had three very different bikes on hand. Above, a cyclocross bike with a very unfinished looking finish that was absolutely beautiful.

The frame was left looking very raw, with discoloration of the metal used to give it great depth and character. It’s a thru-axle design front and rear that, despite the rough look, was quite polished in the details. Sleek internal cable and hose routing, fender mounts and a bit of ornate detailing at the head tube and fork crown showed what they could do.

Plenty of pics, plus a massive front-loading cargo bike for fellow Tennessean Velo Coffee, below…

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Prototype TRP Di2 integration clicks climbers switch into Hylex hydro levers

TRP Di2 climbers button integration on Hylex hydraulic disc brakes

TRP has been playing with Di2 integrations for years now, first showing prototypes in 2011 that quickly progressed into more polished looking versions called HyWire.

But it never really became a commercial product, despite having the perfectly good Hylex singlespeed hydraulic disc brake set on which to mount it. Now, they’re back at it, this time using Shimano’s own climbers button pod and integrating it directly into the Hylex’s cover plate. This one’s still a very early prototype, but it’s certainly more polished than the prototype Ben Berden was running this past season. Equally exciting is the thinking behind how they’ll make it available…

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NAHBS 2015: No. 22 heads to races with 13.1-pound titanium/carbon road bike, updates others

No22 Reactor titanium and carbon race road bike

No. 22′s Reactor is their all-new race bike, taking over the top of the performance line from the Great Divide as a more race oriented model.

It replaces the seat tube with a carbon tube, which maybe saves about 50g when comparing apples to apples. But, since the tube goes all the way thru, it forms a seatmast that ultimately saves about 100g of system weight compared to using a standard seat post. It also allows them to make the ride a bit more compliant and lets them tune the final ride characteristics rather than leave it up to whatever seatpost the customer ended up with.

Up front, it gets an all-new headtube that’s tapered and uses integrated bearing shelves, something more typically found on carbon frames. That lets them use pressed bearings, which are much cleaner looking, and it saves weight. The new tube, headset spec and other details put total weight savings just in the headtube area is 150g.

Not every part of the bike got lighter, though…

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NAHBS 2015: Alchemy debuts Oros MTB, titanium Chiron cyclocross bike & Ethic carbon components!

nahbs 2015 alchemy oros carbon fiber hardtail 29er mountain bike

Alchemy led their booth with the new Oros, their first carbon fiber mountain bike. It uses a trapped rubber molding process to achieve its big, bold shapes without compromising fiber compaction.

Like all of the molds for their other bikes, the Oros’ metal mandrels are made in house. They’re then wrapped in rubber and, after the frame is cured, the thinner metal mandrels can be pulled out, then the rubber becomes loose and can easily be pulled out.

The benefit of this method is that they’re able to get better pressure distribution on much more complex shapes. It also lets them create larger parts of the frame as a single piece. On the Oros, the top, head and downtube is a single piece. The bottom bracket cluster is one piece, the seat tube cluster is one piece, and each side of the rear, from seat stay through the dropouts and up the chainstay is a single piece.

Those pieces are sleeved, so they’re slotting together like tube to tube bikes, but then they’re overwrapped for increased strength.

All of the mandrels and tubes/sections are made in house. Even the rubber parts are cast in house, giving them complete control over the finished product’s shape and ride qualities.

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NAHBS 2015: Liebo Bicycles road bike transforms geometry for ‘cross & gravel, too

Liebo-convertible-road-cyclocross-and-gravel-bike01

If you’re gonna build from scratch a bike that can “do it all”, you may as well design it so the geometry is right for “all” as well. And that was the concept behind Liebo Bicycle’s Kitchunsync road bike, a project that was four years in the making. Blending capabilities for road, cyclocross and gravel into a single bike is a concept that’s gaining ground, but this one allows you to adjust the head angle and wheelbase depending on what sort of ride you’re after. With clever (and perhaps the first) use of a Cane Creek Angleset headset on a  road bike, builder Dave Lieberman found other clever ways to get what he wanted…

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