Search results for: project 24.2

Project 24.2 Review: Lezyne’s tenacious Flow bottle cage

Bottle cages have a pretty simple remit: to hold waterbottles.  Sure, it’s nice if they’re good looking, high tech, or reasonably priced- but all of this is forgotten the moment a bottle goes missing.  Lezyne know this and have built what may be the most tenacious bottle cage I’ve come across.  Is it the cage for you?  Hit the jump to find out!

READ MORE ->

Project 24.2 Review: Shimano RD-M985 XTR Shadow Plus rear derailleur

See all of our Project 24.2 reviews here!

First introduced just about a year ago, Shimano’s XTR Shadow Plus rear derailleur represents one of the first major advances in rear derailleurs that the mountain bike market has embraced in a very long time.  Starting with their low-profile XTR rear mech, Shimano have added (Plus!) a one-way friction clutch to the cage pivot.  By making the derailleur much more willing to take up chain slack than give it, the chain slap is reduced.  Less chain slap means less noise, less frame damage, and (most importantly) reduces the likelihood of the chain being dropped.  After extensive XC and trail use and on the eve of the release of SLX and XT versions, has the added complexity and 30g been worth carrying?  Hit the jump to find out!

READ MORE ->

Project 24.2 Review: Hydrapak’s lightweigt Selva hydration pack

See all of our Project 24.2 reviews here!

Just right.  It’s always subjective assessment, but finding a hydration pack that’s just right for racing has been hard for me.  Sure, most racers wouldn’t be caught dead wearing a pack on race day, but when facing 24 hours’ worth of riding, being able to fix mechanicals, carry a light battery, or grab an emergency snack makes the fashion faux pas worth my while.

Hydrapak’s 4L (plus a 2L bladder) Selva aims to be just right for quick rides and longer races.  Is this the little bag that could?  Or did it leave me wanting for a bit more (or less)?  Pass the break to find out!

READ MORE ->

Project 24.2 Review: Roval’s do-it-all Control Trail SL wheelset

See all of our Project 24.2 reviews here!

If you could only have one wheelset, what would it look like?  Every rider is different, but for me, it would sport sturdy rims wide enough to handle true 2.3in tires, have a proven freehub, be compatible with several hub standards, freakishly light, and not too expensive.  Something that would be up to day-to-day aggressive trail use, big weekends with the boys in Sedona or Moab, and maybe light enough for the odd 24-hour race.  It would be tubeless and require as little maintenance as possible.  That’s a lot to ask of a wheelset- but when it arrived last September, Roval’s Control Trail SL wheelset looked last fall to be every one of those things.  Eight months later, has it lived up to its early promise?  Hit the jump to find out…

READ MORE ->

Project 24.2 Review Update: Road ID’s lightweight Wrist ID Slim

See all of our Project 24.2 posts here!

While it has worked so far, I decided to go in a different direction when it came time to update the contact information on my Road ID Wrist ID Elite.  As temperatures have gone from wintery to downright hot, the wide silicone band has been on the warm side.  More importantly, I’ve been spending more time on our mountains’ rough and rocky trails and the weight added by the Elite’s stainless deployment clasp has caused the ID to rattle around more than I’d like.  When I saw that a new Wrist ID Slim would cost $1 less than a replacement ID Tag for the Wrist ID Elite, the decision to give the smallest Road ID a try was easy. Cross the line for my thoughts…

READ MORE ->

Project 24.2 Review: Keeping our soft parts soft with Okole Stuff

See all of our Project 24.2 posts here!

Every cyclist has spent a good day in the saddle feeling happy and loving life- only to sit down at work the next day realizing that more than a unpleasant amount rubbing and chapping has occurred. Sometimes, it doesn’t even take until the next day.  Shaving, years of saddle time and proper fitting shorts can all help to eliminate inner thigh rubbing induced redness (ITRR), but not in all cases. In the hopes of easing the pain of training for and racing in this spring’s 24 Hours in the Old Pueblo, Enduro Stuff sent out their Okole (“butt” in Hawaiian) Stuff chamois ointment for Alex and I to try.  Did the thick allantoin, tea tree oil, and aloe enriched Stuff make believers of our Okoles?  Go below the belt to find out…

READ MORE ->

Project 24.2 Review: Smith’s all-but-invisible Pivlock V2 sunglasses

See all of our Project 24.2 posts here!
In my Project 24.2 kickoff post last winter, I said that if Smith’s second generation Pivlock V2s were even a little bit better than the super-light, super-comfortable Pivlock V90s, then they’d be my new favorite sunglasses.  Though an adjustable nosepiece has been added, the Pivlock V2s are largely a stylistic update on their popular frameless v90s.  As with their predecessors, by relying on the lens to provide much of the glasses’ structure, Smith are able to provide the wearer with a virtually unobstructed field of view, a gentle, head-holding fit, and minimal weight- all Very Good Things.  Have the V2s become my new favorites?  Look behind the curtain to find out…

Updated Project 24.2 Review: Vittoria’s made-to-order Supra MTB shoes

See all of our Project 24.2 reviews here!

Made in Italy.  That little phrase- though increasingly hard to find- is almost magical in the cycling world.  Not only does it signify a high-end product, but those three words evoke a land where food is enjoyed, style is effortless, and cycling is a part of culture.  Founded by an accomplished racer and in business for over 35 years, Vittoria make each and every pair of their shoes- from under $100 to over $400- at their factory in Italy.

Vittoria’s manufacturing flexibility is a big part of their current story.  While the company produces 81 stock model/color combinations in 27 sizes, three non-standard widths are available in addition to their standard width at no charge.  Even different-sized pairs are available for a nominal fee.  Want mountain uppers on road soles?  No problem.  Want carbon-soled, mountain-treaded shoes with uppers from the company’s stylish 1976 line?  You bet.  Vittoria USA can make any of this happen in 2-3 weeks from your order to when they land in your local bike shop.

With their $300 sticker coming well under high end Asian-made (not that there’s anything wrong with that) shoes from bigger brands, how have Vittoria’s Supra MTBs treated my feet?  Pretty darn well.  Click through for the details…
READ MORE ->

Project 24.2 Review: Specialized’s Comfy Henge Expert Saddle

See all of our Project 24.2 posts here!

With Specialized providing the aft contact points for our Project 24.2 race bike, I suspected that my happy parts would be in good hands.  Falling under their Body Geometry aegis, Specialized’s saddles were developed in conjunction with one Dr. Roger Minkow to “eliminate numbness and soreness normally associated with other saddles by enhancing blood flow in men.”  Who doesn’t like the sound of that?  With a wide range of saddles in three sizes and with an excellent reputation for comfort, it was a safe bet that something would work for my body.  Click through to find out what I tried and why the Henge is my new dirt favorite.

READ MORE ->