SRAM Hydraulic Recall Full Story Explained, Consumer Brakesets Available

SRAM Hydraulic brake recall final update

There is no denying the fact that the Hydraulic Road recall was a major set back for SRAM. Having to issue a massive recall for such a new and exciting product is never easy, but under the direction of president Stan Day, SRAM stepped up to the challenge and now has most consumers sorted and new brakes well in production. Since the recall was first issued, the recovery process has been the number one priority with Stan leading meetings constantly to drive progress. Essentially completely redesigning a product in record time, SRAM had to pull resources from future development to get it done.

The brakes are in, and the full details are after the break…

SRAM Hydro recall final update red force rival s700 (10)

Soon after the hydraulic road brakes came out, SRAM first received several reports of brakes with a loss of power during an extremely cold weekend of cyclocross racing across the county. As it turns out the issue involved air being ingested into the master cylinder caused by inconsistencies (a very slight ovalization) in the manufacturing of the bore, which was made worse by inabilities of seal material to accommodate for inconsistencies especially in cold temperatures.

After an intense redesign of the brakes, and a grueling three months of testing brakes 24/7, SRAM has solved the issues and is currently in full production of SRAM Red and S700. New brakes have been tested to temperature extremes from -20º to 104º C, though they high end of the temperature range was never an issue. The original Red and S700 brakes join the new Force 22, Force CX1, and new Rival 22 hydraulic options to offer hydraulic brakes at every level from Apex (S700) to Red.

At this point SRAM has fulfilled the production needs for reequipping consumer’s bikes, so all shops should have your replacements by now if you haven’t already picked them up. According to SRAM, when consumers were asked if they wanted to wait for the hydraulics or opt for mechanicals with a refund, an overwhelming 90% of consumers decided to wait for the new crop of hydraulics. Production for new bikes is ongoing with brakes shipping in a few weeks. SRAM expects full retail availability for the entire range in August, 2014 just in time for the coming cross season.

SRAM Hydro recall final update red force rival s700 (2)

SRAM Hydro recall final update red force rival s700 (7) SRAM Hydro recall final update red force rival s700 (6)

In addition to the new seals, material was removed from the outer master cylinder for improved grip, lighter weight, and an improved manufacturing process. The whole assembly got slightly smaller with a shorter shifter lever to prevent hang ups on bar. Bleeding will be easier thanks to a newly designed bleed port which is still in the same, top facing location. The brakes also feature a shortened dead band and a wider range of reach adjustment. A bigger reservoir with more fluid and improved, more flexible bladder provides better pad advance along with the lighter pad spring.

SRAM Hydro recall final update red force rival s700 (11) SRAM Hydro recall final update red force rival s700 (5)

Officially, the disc brakes are optimized for road and cross with 18mm pistons front and rear. As far as rotors, SRAM is keen on using 160mm for the pavement, while 140mm are fine for riding off road. SRAM is offering five hydraulic groups with Red 22, Force 22 (same internals as red with material differences), Force CX1 (left brake lever is only difference between Force 22), the new Rival 22, and S700 – the latter is the only 10 speed option in the group. All brake lever/shifters are available in standard or moto options, and disc brakes will include the new Centerline rotors in both 6 bolt or Centerlock.

Our own set just showed up at the office, so look for actual weights and first impressions soon. In the meantime, here are the complete group details:

SRAM Red:

  • Features: • Carbon levers
  • Titanium hardware
  • Easy bleed access
  • Fully sealed system
  • Rotors: 160mm pavement, 140mm off-road
  • Centerline rotors (sold separately)
  • Rim or disc
  • Weights: HRR: 387g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose 600mm) HRD: 449g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 160mm Centerline rotor)
  • MSRP: • HRR: $508/ €452/ £386 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper) HRD: $590/ €524/ £448 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)

SRAM Force:

  • DNA of SRAM RED 22
  • Carbon brake levers, Aluminum shift levers
  • Stainless hardware
  • Fully sealed system
  • Rotors: 160mm pavement, 140mm off-road
  • Centerline rotors (sold separately)
  • Rim or disc
  • Weights: HRR: 405g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose 600mm) HRD: 471g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 160mm Centerline rotor)
  • MSRP: HRR: $421/ €374/ £320 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper) HRD: $449/ €399/ £341 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)

SRAM Force CX1:

  • Carbon brake levers, Aluminum shifter
  • Stainless hardware
  • Centerline rotors (sold separately)
  • Weights: Right-Standard: 471g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 140mm Center line rotor) Left-Standard: 431g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 140mm Center line rotor)
  • MSRP: • Right-Standard: $449/ €399/ £341 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper) Left-Standard: $402/ €357/ £305 per wheel (Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)

SRAM Rival 22:

  • Aluminum levers
  • Stainless hardware
  • Fully sealed system
  • Rotors: 160mm pavement, 140mm off-road
  • Options: Centerline rotors (sold separately)
  • Weights: HRR: 422g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose 600mm) HRD: 493g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 160mm Centerline rotor)
  • MSRP: HRR: $334/ €297/ £254 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper) HRD: $384/ €341/ £292 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)

SRAM S700:

  • 10 Speed Compatible Only
  • Aluminum Shift and Brake lever
  • Stainless hardware
  • Quick Release
  • Tools-free contact pad adjust
  • Tire clearance: 28c
  • Firecrest rim compatibility (27.4mm)
  • Centerline rotors (sold separately)
  • Rim or disc
  • Weights: HRR: 422g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose 600mm) HRD: 493g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 160mm Centerline rotor)
  • MSRP: HRR: $398/ €334/ £302 (Per wheel – Includes Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper) HRD: $469/ €417/ £356 (Per wheel – Includes Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)

Comments

Huck - 06/20/14 - 9:25am

HaHaHa….Nice try but Shimano mechanical R-685 are only $699 for a whole bikes worth!

adam - 06/20/14 - 9:36am

Has there been any weights published for the 685′s yet? I am thinking of jumping off of the SRAM ship for those.

LOLWUT - 06/20/14 - 10:35am

Not the same case in Canada… Just FYI for all the happy Canadian SRAM users.

stan_day - 06/20/14 - 11:01am

Nice sram advert, they are still the same terrible design now just won’t fail catastrophically when it gets cold. They will still have all of the shortcomings of all Avid/Sram brakes. Oh but wait! They made the shift lever smaller so that it doesn’t smash your fingers, why not change the inherent problem with them in the first place and move the pivot location so this doesn’t happen at all? Also good luck making these work for people with small hands because the only way to make them not feel like a** is to dial the reach pretty much all the way out. And of course 90% of people wanted to get back on hydros, who wants to ride a 15 year old brake design on their new plastic bike?

MTNBKR83 - 06/20/14 - 11:11am

I have a set of the new S700′s for sale if anyone is interested!

JMH - 06/20/14 - 11:25am

Soap Box –

To all my friends in the bike biz… I keep reading a word over and over again that I want you to hate as much as I do: Consumer. Consumers buy Units at the lowest Pricepoint at WalMart. Consumers buy commodities because they need them. Consumer is an ugly word that implies a faceless link in a boring chain with an inability to be selective, to be complex, to enjoy.

But this is cycling. Many of us claim to be in touch with the lifestyle enough to know that Riders buy Bikes and love them for various reasons, “need” has little to do with it. Our customers are choosing a life that excites them, which to me is the antithesis of consuming. So please, eliminate this word from your vocabulary. Interrupt and correct the next guy that buries it in a string of TLAs. Riders are the audience. Passion is what we are offering.

dwiz - 06/20/14 - 11:42am

well said JMH, well said. can I join you on your soapbox?

dorkdisk - 06/20/14 - 11:47am

These salespeople and marketers should have done more engineering and quality control

ECO - 06/20/14 - 11:50am

I have installed the new S700 HRD on my CX bike with 140mm rotors and am very please. They have excellent modulation, power, and feel. It’s so good, I wish my road bike had them.

fgh - 06/20/14 - 12:03pm

been using the new brakes for a few weeks now and they feel about the same as the old ones:
braking is just as good
comfort wise feels as good
looks wise a little less chunky
they indeed fixed the over lap between shifters and brakes when you pressed hard

so basically so far I can’t find them any fault unless you don’t like the look or something.

note: I’m not using the centerline discs – I suspect they’re lighter with less material than avids and thus heat up faster hence the 160mm rear for long road decents. also I got the reds

jen - 06/20/14 - 12:12pm

yea think ill stick with shimano.

tinsloth - 06/20/14 - 12:15pm

FGH,

The Centerline rotors are actually less prone to overheating, due to MORE material. The doubled the number of support arms, which will increase heat dissipation, and resist “cupping” or warping with excess heat, which should reduce the chances of the rotor rubbing the pads. The main goal, as I understand it with Centerline rotors was to reduce the brake noise/vibration and improve heat dissipation.

lonefrontranger - 06/20/14 - 12:33pm

thank you JMH that is a great rant.

“when consumers were asked if they wanted to wait for the hydraulics or opt for mechanicals with a refund, an overwhelming 90% of consumers decided to wait for the new crop of hydraulics.”

yes this ties with our experience. The mechanical replacements are not even close in performance, feel or durability (pad wear).

everyone else: If you prefer shimanos, that’s perfectly fine – they make a great product. I’ve had failures with mineral oil systems at low temperatures, and I race CX in Colorado where it’s frequently in the single digits F at my race start time.

If you don’t want SRAM, or it doesn’t work for your needs, or it’s too expensive, THEN DON’T BUY IT. Simple as that.

wootah - 06/20/14 - 12:40pm

It’s quite impressive that SRAM was able to redesign an entire system and get it out to production so quickly. And the upside is that there’s less time to wait for an improved version, since it sounds like the engineers got to roll out improvements during the re-launch.

Wondering why the S700 hydro setup is more expensive than the Rival 22 version, or am I misreading?

nh - 06/20/14 - 3:57pm

I have got my replacement brakes and they are fantastic. It sucked that they had to recall them but the communication and service through the process has been great. They replaced everything, even the rotors.

Everyone has their own preference but strong competition between SRAM and Shimano is a good thing for ‘consumers’ and will lead to better products.

jj - 06/20/14 - 4:06pm

How much does SRAM pay Bikerumor? We are still awaiting the arrival of all our recalled brakes. SRAM has failed one of its biggest supporters in the area. They were not delivered on time. According to the BIKERUMOR articles which featured Stan telling us a delivery date they, in fact were a month late. This is assuming you have all the product to support your customers in your shop. We do not. SO exactly where are you getting this very false information BIKERUMOr? My guess is from the very well paid SRAM marketing team.

GrindMyGears - 06/20/14 - 6:16pm

jj – shouldn’t you spend this time complaining to SRAM and working through it with them, instead of ranting on a “rumor blog”?

Ripnshread - 06/20/14 - 7:16pm

@JMH More people in this industry should think that way and it would be more profitable for everyone. I like to call us “Enthusiasts”.

gabbia - 06/20/14 - 8:46pm

FRANKENSHIFTERS…it lives, well at least until they’re recalled because they’re horrible.
I’ll stick with Shimano.

johnny - 06/20/14 - 8:50pm

Ouch no thanks I’ll stick with Shimano.

jj - 06/20/14 - 9:52pm

GMG,

What? Why? So they’ll send me some chains? Pretty much the whole front page is SRAM corporation product drivel today. Praising them for false delivery times is suspect. Sorry for pointing that out. Their marketing department is stellar.

rodegeek - 06/20/14 - 11:14pm

SRAM frequently causes confusion when they publish delivery schedules or estimates. They are a manufacturer, so when they say delivery date, that’s the date they produce finished goods. Add transit time (3 to 10 days via air freight, 25-50 days via ocean to N.America). Then add time for the distributor to stock them and transit time for the retailer to get them.
It’d be nice if they explained that to the media every time they launch new products.

Brattercakes - 06/21/14 - 12:44am

Well said Rodegeek.

CXisfun - 06/21/14 - 10:23am

I’ve ridden the old recalled ones, the new replacements, and my R785. I will NOT be giving up my R785 for the replacement SRAM Red brakes. Won’t happen.

Mike - 06/21/14 - 11:03am

The deadband prior to engagement was a killer for me. Making it shorter is the right direction, but it needs be at zero before I’ll them on a bike that needs brakes. And I’m wrote happy with my mechanicals.

quickgeezer - 06/21/14 - 5:09pm

I think when you wrote that they’d been tested at temperatures from –20º to 104º C, you should’ve indicated Fahrenheit, not centigrade, since 100º C is the boiling point of water.

quickgeezer - 06/21/14 - 5:10pm

I think when you wrote that they’d been tested at temperatures from –20º to 104º C, you probably meant to indicate Fahrenheit, not centigrade, since 100º C is the boiling point of water.

Jason - 06/21/14 - 6:19pm

@Mike. Wouldn’t a deadband of zero mean brake drag? Maybe I misunderstand. How is such a deadband even remotely worse than rim brakes?

John - 06/21/14 - 9:53pm

Is it just me, or are the brake hoods are freakishly tall?

Paniagua - 06/22/14 - 12:46am

I think we now know Stan Days’ pen name – Zach Overholt

Andy - 06/22/14 - 11:26am

I’m still waiting on the article about why avid elixir’s suck and the meetings president Stan Day led to drive progress.

Meanwhile, Shimano just keeps making solid tech and and doesn’t issue press releases saying how hard they work– it’s evident in the quality if their products.

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