Mountain Bike PSA of the Week: Ride Wet Trails & You Kill a Kitten

Comments

patrik - 03/31/14 - 4:43pm

Not buying it.

The planet’s been around for billions and billions of years, it will be around for billions and billions more. I’m sure it can take care of a few rutted trails. On a long enough timeline, all trails are and will be in excellent shape.

If I can ride, I’m riding, official closure notwithstanding.

MDubs - 03/31/14 - 5:02pm

I sort of agree with patrik on this one. I mean, common sense is still OK to use right? I’ve biked a long time, and at times I’ve left ruts on soft muddy trails. At times, I have also gone back and repaired areas I’ve ridden through or repaired ruts left by others. In honor of opening day, Mother Nature bats last, and besides I’m more of a dog person anyway.

-s - 03/31/14 - 5:10pm

Small ruts due to some mud is not what he is talking about. Full blown mud season in New England can create completely unusable trails if proper care is not taken. Plus, if the trails are on private property (which is many around here,) we can run the risk of losing them.

Colin - 03/31/14 - 5:23pm

Here in SW Idaho almost all of our trails are multi use, bikes, hikers and equestrian, but the sad part is that the people doing the most damage are the hikers and the horse riders. Never the less, the bikes get blamed for the damage and the bikes are always the first ones to get temporarily or perma banned from an area.

My thoughts are that if there are absolutely no bike tire tracks in the mud that public perception may change. That may be naive, but that’s what I hope at least.

WannaBeSTi - 03/31/14 - 5:27pm

I say: “Go ride the muddy trails.” Just make sure you bring your bike to me for service…

Thom P. - 03/31/14 - 5:28pm

- s- is 100% correct. Trails and issues regarding access to trails differ from place to place. This message is mainly specific to New England. The planet may have been around for billions of years but, here in New England, our access could to trails on this part of the planet could end tomorrow if we don’t act responsibly. We can’t afford to take a myopic, Manifest Destiny approach toward trail riding.

matt - 03/31/14 - 6:06pm

Sorry, I still ride the local trails all winter long, I know the local trail “builders” are going to come back before summer with their level and trowel to smooth everything back off to something resembling a highway.

Rico - 03/31/14 - 6:25pm

Yeah i’d second what -s- and Thom say. I used to be of the mindset that I was riding no matter what, that the trails will be fine, that this is my back yard, etc.. Not until I did some trail work and helped cut some of our own trails with these guys did i see how fragile it really is, and what goes into it.

I wonder if this is only new england which is super rocky. Washed out trails suck!

SedonaBikeMech - 03/31/14 - 8:00pm

Stay off muddy trails. I think NEMBA knows what they’re talking about, and their official statements carry more weight than your opinion. They live and breathe trail construction, maintenance, and enjoyment. This is not specific to New England. As someone from the southwest, stay off muddy trails – especially ones you don’t help to maintain.

badbikemechanic - 03/31/14 - 8:35pm

It has been a very long winter. Those of us who like to partake in the mountain biking have been off the trails for a long time. I would like to take this guy’s advice but the crack pipe is too hard to resist. Look for my rut at Fountain Head VA.

d - 03/31/14 - 11:21pm

well said Thom P and s. and another cracking PSA from Dirtwire!

Tim - 03/31/14 - 11:49pm

I ditto Patrik….
“The planet’s been around for billions and billions of years, it will be around for billions and billions more. I’m sure it can take care of a few rutted trails” and 99.999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999% of the world outside 4 people will ever see them….how stupid can you be.

TNT - 04/01/14 - 12:01am

In Houston our trails are mostly clay and get destroyed by riding them wet. Memorial park was one of the best urban trail systems in the country. It is now down to about five miles of single track due to wet ridding. It also used to be very flowy and smooth. Now we have ruts and roots everywhere. So all the ass hats that want to ride wet trails, remember someone is probably working very hard to maintain and fix your damage.

BigBuckHunter - 04/01/14 - 12:02am

I’ve been riding New England trails for 20 years and have yet to see a “completely destroyed” trail or anything even close to it from wet spring riding. Oh — and the last group I’ll ever listen to about anything is NEMBA. Bunch of old Fred’s who have the collective cycling skill of most 6-year-olds. If they’re so concerned about my deep ruts then maybe they can clean up the mess I left this weekend — they’re decent at trail maintenance, after all They’re like mountain biking’s janitorial crew.

Derp - 04/01/14 - 12:03am

I’ve been riding New England trails for 20 years and have yet to see a “completely destroyed” trail or anything even close to it from wet spring riding. Oh — and the last group I’ll ever listen to about anything is NEMBA. Bunch of old Fred’s who have the collective cycling skill of most 6-year-olds. If they’re so concerned about my deep ruts then maybe they can clean up the mess I left this weekend — they’re decent at trail maintenance, after all They’re like mountain biking’s janitorial crew.

Frederick Punter - 04/01/14 - 1:11am

Good thing cats are filled with the soul of satan……

joe - 04/01/14 - 2:00am

If we stopped riding just because the trails were wet in the UK then nobody would ever ride anywhere. Muddy trails are a factor of riding, surely a bit more thought in trail construction and some regular work will solve the issue of trashed trails. If you ride a trail you should help maintain it, otherwise you’re just being a selfish so-and-so.

This does explain a lot about the mud clearance on some US equipment though…

gringo - 04/01/14 - 8:11am

This is a nice idea if you live / ride in the western US. But simply not realistic as a global statement.

see examples: England, Scotland, Norway, Sweden, German, Switzerland, Austria, Coastal BC, Costa Rica, New Zealand.

as stated above, a little shovel work now and then along with well laid out trails sounds like a more realistic solution.

Mattbyke - 04/01/14 - 9:39am

Actually , CT NEMBA is made up of serious cyclists . Without the long time hard work in dealing with the state and private owners , there would be very little legal trail. The real heavy lifting is done in public and legislative out reach .
Big buck hunter is exactly the ignorant and old mentality we don’t need. If you’d come out for a few trail maint days , and attended some DEEP and CFP meetings , you’d have a stronger appreciation for or hard won resource.

BigBuckHunter - 04/01/14 - 10:25am

Matty — I am actually speaking about the CT NEMBA Freds! I have plenty of trails to ride that you derps have never touched. Stick to Waldo. Say hi to mother hen Paula Burton for me. Now go clean my ruts!

Gerow - 04/02/14 - 12:20am

In western Oregon we ride trails in the mud because we would only have two months of good single track if we didn’t. Some trail builders will even hash out a trail, then throw a race on it to get it burned in. Many of us even take pride in how well we can ride deep mud when it has been raining for months.

It really depends on soil composition, and the overall weather patterns of your region.
I say if you live where it rains a lot, ride the mud as much as you want. Just make sure to do you part building and maintaining trail.

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