New Cycling Books: Land of Second Chances & Reading The Race

cycling books - land of second chances and reading the race

Two new tomes about cycling just flipped through the door, one to inspire you to race for the right reasons, and one showing you how to race right.

In Land of Second Chances, author Tim Lewis covers Rwandan cyclist Adrien Niyonshuti, who was only seven years old during the 1994 genocides that ravaged his nation, and his coach Jonathan Boyer (first American to race in the Tour de France), all around cyclist and do-gooder Tom Ritchey and Rwandan President Paul Kagame. Their struggle to create a national cycling team and its benefits to the community is told in this true story about “finding redemption in the eyes of the world.”

It’s been fairly well received, and you can read the first chapter online here. Retail is $24.95 (street price is lower), and it’s 256 hardcovered pages.

If you’re more concerned with your own racing story, flip the page to check out Reading the Race to see how things should come together in the peloton…

Race announcer Jamie Smith and pro roadie Chris Horner team up to deliver “a master class in bike racing strategies and tactics.” We’ve all heard the banter between the hosts while watching Le Tour and other classics about how riders and coaches are strategizing. Now, you can learn the same strategies, starting with choosing the right teammates based on the course and the competition. From there, lessons on forming deals between rivals, when and how to form or chase a break and how to not piss off the rest of the peloton all come together.

The icing on the cake? Tips on how to “win” the group ride. Because we all like to win Sundays in the off season.

Retail is $18.95 (street price is lower) for 256 paperback pages. Catch the first chapter here.

Comments

Darwin - 10/16/13 - 9:23pm

No Kindle version of the Reading the race book. You can do that yourself and upload it to Amazon so I never understand why any book doesn’t also have a Kindle version.

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