Specialized Offers Women Two Sides of Tri with New Alias

specialized alias womens tri bike

When you want to get into triathlons, there is always the question – do you go with a tri bike, or a road bike? The tri bike is undoubtedly better for most tri course while the road bike is better for the training leading up to the tri. Tri shops have been fitting entry level triathletes on road bikes that are then modified by adding zero offset posts and aerobars for triathlon use for years, but with the Alias, Women have another option straight off the showroom floor. Called the Alias because of its dual nature, with clip on aerobars and a zero offset post, the Alias is a race oriented tri bike with aerodynamically shaped tubes and a steeper seat tube angle (where as the example above, the bikes have slacker seat tubes and need forward offset posts). Remove the clip ons and add the 35mm set back seat post, and the Alias geometry is tuned to handle like a road bike on the open road. The alias also offers additional top tube stowage with the Remora bolt on storage box.

If you can only have one bike for training or racing, the Alias is ready straight out of the box.

specialized alias womens tri bike pro

At the top of the range you’ll find $6,000 Alias Pro Tri, a well equipped, race ready bike for the road or Tri. The frame like all of the Alias bikes, uses Specialized’ FACT 10r carbon with Women’s specific Alias geometry and an OSBB and a 1 1/8″ straight steerer. Built with Dura Ace shifty bits and a Specialized FACT carbon BB30 crank, the Pro rolls on Specialized’ Roval Rapide CL 40 carbon wheels.

specialized alias womens tri bike comp

The middle Alias is the $3,300 Comp Tri which includes a Shimano Ultegra drivetrain, FSA Gossamer Pro BB30 crankset, Fulcrum S5 wheels, and Specialized Aero Clip on extensions.

specialized alias womens tri bike sport

The Alias Sport Tri rounds out the line up and comes in at $2,600 with a Shimano 105/Tiagra mix, FSA Gossamer BB30 crank, Axis 2.0 wheels, and Specialized Aero clip on extensions.

20130924_sAlias-0049(1)

The bolt on Remora storage box has a flexible cover with a slot down the middle to stash your gels.

Comments

Matthew - 10/10/13 - 7:07pm

I’m not sure what Specialized actually did here, really. It looks like a road bike that can handle either a straight or layback post, and has an aluminum handlebar so you can add clip on aero extensions.

In other words: they made a road bike.

I like the idea of “one bike does two things”, but how does this bike fill a gap that any other Specialized aero road bike frame doesn’t, besides more direct marketing towards women?

Bill - 10/10/13 - 7:21pm

For 6K you can get a dedicated carbon time trial bike with TT shifters, and actual uh, TT bike geometry (hint, that isn’t just “shove the seat forward”!) AND still have enough left over to at minimum buy another bike for the road. We’re not talking no name stuff either. Big red S has been doing some really cool things lately, regardless of your opinion of them, but this is just stupid, and potentially dangerous. Beginners don’t need to be on bad geometry bikes, in road rides, or triathlon. This is a clear land grab without educating the buyers, and it’s really changed my opinion of them as a company.

a different Mike - 10/10/13 - 7:49pm

“Tri shops have been fitting entry level triathletes on road bikes that are then modified by adding zero offset posts and aerobars for triathlon use for years, but with the Alias, Women have another option straight off the showroom floor. Called the Alias because of its dual nature, with clip on aerobars and a zero offset post, the Alias is a race oriented tri bike with aerodynamically shaped tube”

So from what I can tell, for years tri shops have been adding the zero offest post before adding the aero bars but now specialized has inovated a way to add aerobars before the zero offest post.

brad - 10/10/13 - 7:57pm

the bike starts at 2600 folks settle down. and ive got a few customers already pumped about this bike.

Fishy fish - 10/10/13 - 8:25pm

If i am not mistaken this is sort of “the womens Venge” so when you skip the aerobars you essentially have a venge with womens geo.

Ben - 10/10/13 - 8:57pm

Not to add to the usual Bikerumor collection of snarky comments… But specialized sure likes to recycle model names through the years.

Epic Road Bike vs. Epic Mountain Bike
Fatboy BMX Bike vs. Fatboy Fat Bike
Alias Saddle vs. Alias Womens Bike

Keepin’ it green!

$dmoney$ - 10/10/13 - 11:14pm

Sweet! Now can Kestrel sue the big S like they sue everyone else? The Talon had a way better look though so maybe not.

Tim - 10/11/13 - 1:15am

I like it, but how does one train when both bikes are getting a tune up?

Antoine - 10/11/13 - 2:19am

That is neither road or tri bike, it looks like a commuter to me. I don’t think that women racing a bit seriously will be good with such a “nose in the wind position”.
The proposed aerobars have way too much stack that make it even worse.
I think there is a market for such a bike for sure but the execution is not good. That is very bad because as S marketing is good they’ll sell tons of those and beginner will have a flawed bike.

george dk - 10/11/13 - 2:33am

question is, will we miss all these early Sunday tri-clowns, training with their noisy bulky beasts?

Chad - 10/11/13 - 7:10am

In no way is this true. re:
“The tri bike is undoubtedly better for most tri course while the road bike is better for the training leading up to the tri.”
Proper tri fit targets very specific muscle group usage and one should train and race in the same position.
Save your road bike for leisure rides where intensity and “training” are far from your mind.

Garett - 10/11/13 - 9:44am

Do BikeRumor readers ever like anything?

jaas - 10/11/13 - 10:37am

come to bike rumor. feel the hate.

Matt - 10/11/13 - 10:52am

@Fishy fish
I like just thinking of it as a “Women’s Venge” makes lots of sense now.

Plus they avoided a bunch of pink/purple/flower paint schemes so that’s nice.

…unfortunately they decided to be ‘edgy’ by offering it in black, white, and red.

bazookasean - 10/11/13 - 11:29am

Local bike shops will love this one. Hope the fitters are looking forward to customers asking for refits before and after every race, and then expecting it to be free of charge. It’s an aero road bikes with aero bars in the box. Marketing at it’s best.
Also, apparently there are no men who are just getting into tri and don’t want to have to buy two road machines. They’re better that that?

Zach Overholt - 10/11/13 - 12:34pm

@chad, you’re right. That should have read something like the road bike is good for group rides where aero bars aren’t allowed, and extremely hilly training rides where the tri position isn’t advantageous.

Padrote - 10/11/13 - 12:36pm

If you’re gonna bag on bikerumor posters for being fickle, an article about a specialized tri bike isn’t a good place to start.

matt - 10/11/13 - 1:15pm

Advice: before posting comments about the geometry or about it being a road bike with aero bars, check out the actual geometry of the bike. It is not “just a women’s Venge with clipons.”
They created a specific bike for a growing target market, good for them. They will undoubtedly sell lots of them, but at least there will hopefully be less people sticking powerbars to their toptubes.

NDE - 10/11/13 - 4:16pm

$dmoney$ – you beat me to it. I was going to say Kestrel has been doing this for over 10 years but it no big deal that other company’s want to do it too. It just the big deal Specialized made over it the other day.

In reality, as long as it gets people, especially women, interested in riding and racing I don’t what it is.

bazookasean - 10/11/13 - 6:18pm

Matt- I did look at the geometry. The eff. top tube length is the same as their women’s road bike. The Reach is only 4mm different. Use a zero offset or forward offset post (both are available) and you have the same bike like I said. Seat angle is irrelevant when you have post options. This bike will be a crappy road bike if it’s fit like a TT bike or visa versa. I just feel like it would be a pain to have to refit the seat and bar position if you want it to be effective with it’s “two sides”.

notmikeb - 10/12/13 - 2:21pm

I don’t want it, therefore it sucks. Alternatively, I DO want it but can’t afford it therefore it sucks. Having been in the bike industry for the last decade or so, I’ve built one version or another of this concept countless times for women triathletes who are looking to make the leap from their hybrid but aren’t ready to commit to a full triathlon bike. Kudos to Specialized for putting it together in a well designed package that looks like a very versatile setup.

P.S. How can you make a women’s Venge and NOT call it the Vaj?

Cynthia - 10/23/13 - 7:21pm

I’ve looked at the geometry and it is different than a road bike. Also, why not buy an extra seat and seat post, so no refitting, just swap out the post . I think it will sell and it’s a nice start for women getting into tri who also want to do group rides.

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