EB13: Closeup Look at 2014 Pinarello Dogma Hydro Disc Brake Road Bike, Dogma XC Full Suspension MTB

2014 Pinarello Dogma XM full suspension mountain bike detail photos

Teased with an overly gushing video earlier this summer, the Pinarello Dogma XC full suspension mountain bike’s looks certainly lived up to the hype. Whether it rides as well is something we’ll have to check out separately. For now, we’ve got a lot of detail photos and a bit more info on it and the new Dogma K Hydro disc brake road bike.

The XM shares a lot of front end features with their hardtail, including the internal cable routing, fork crown bumper and split top tube seat clamp device. The rear end is what’s really unique, featuring asymmetric shock placement with a lower link routed around the bottom bracket, flex stays and more…

2014 Pinarello Dogma XM full suspension mountain bike detail photos

Rather than bend the downtube to create clearance, they simply integrated a rubber bumper to catch the fork’s crown in the event things get sideways.

2014 Pinarello Dogma XM full suspension mountain bike detail photos

The rear triangle is one piece with no rear pivot near the axle, the goal being to reduce a weak point on the frame. A bolt-on brace connects the seatstays from left to right to prevent torsional or uneven flex. The system drives an alloy rocker arm that pushes the shock straight down. The front derailleur floats on the chainstay.

2014 Pinarello Dogma XM full suspension mountain bike detail photos

The seatstays are flattened to allow for flex, which is necessary since there’s no rear pivot. The system provides 90mm of rear wheel travel.

2014 Pinarello Dogma XM full suspension mountain bike detail photos

The other particularly different part about the bike is the lower shock mount. Rather than unnecessarily reinforce the carbon tube to handle the stresses of the shock pushing into it, they built an alloy mount that connects to the frame around the bottom bracket. Whether this saves any weight (or adds it) is questionable, but it does remove the forces from the downtube and puts them at a part of the bike that needs to be super stiff and strong anyway.

2014 Pinarello Dogma XM full suspension mountain bike detail photos

Pinarello’s trademark use of asymmetry is all over this bike – note the downtube’s differing profiles from left to right.

2014 Pinarello Dogma XM full suspension mountain bike detail photos

A 12×142 rear axle finishes things off at the back.

2014 Pinarello Dogma K Hydro disc brake road bike detail photos

We covered the new road bikes briefly here, too, with more models and info. The Dogma K Hydro shown here is one of two disc brake models for 2014, but it’s the more exciting one for us because it uses more traditional standards rather than a glut of Pinarello specific bearing sizes and Italian threading.

2014 Pinarello Dogma K Hydro disc brake road bike detail photos

If you’ve followed Pinarello for any amount of time, you’ll know they’ve used some pretty random bearing sizes in their headsets, which can make replacing them a real challenge. Thankfully, the Dogma K gets standard drop in 1-1/8″ to 1-1/2″ bearings. And note the clearance for those nice, big Conti tires! Go ahead, do a little dance.

2014 Pinarello Dogma K Hydro disc brake road bike detail photos

The asymmetry carries down to the fork here, along with a super clean brake hose routing. Click to enlarge the image and you’ll notice that the disc brake fork leg is thicker than the driveside, and the shaping of its ridges are different, too.

2014 Pinarello Dogma K Hydro disc brake road bike detail photos

Very clean rear brake hose routing, too. While not everyone likes PFBB30, it’s certainly easier getting parts for it than the Italian threaded bottom brackets still found on some of their other models.

2014 Pinarello Dogma K Hydro disc brake road bike detail photos

Plenty of tire clearance in the rear, too.

Pinarello.com

Comments

pornitswhatlwouldratherbmaking - 09/13/13 - 10:03am

Its nice but for the crap ton of money they will charge there are other fs bikes l would rather have.

Indian Ross - 09/13/13 - 10:23am

Ahhh Pinarello, stick to road bikes–whats next a road bike from Niner?

Jason - 09/13/13 - 10:34am

I’d take a Italian threaded BB any day over a press fit. They aren’t that hard to find.

mechanic - 09/13/13 - 10:36am

Good thing the guys that will buy this pre-ABP fuel with flimsy hardware, don’t actually ride.

fleche - 09/13/13 - 11:22am

from what i read on the tech in that fs bike it could be amazing, using he carbon to lock the travel until it begins to flex is very their way of doing things. It more than anything reminds me of the Cannondale 26in scalpel with its flex stays.

I think they could have serious XC bike if the weight is low enough and the stiffness is there.

dave - 09/13/13 - 12:36pm

TRP HY/RD brakes… Hydraulic road disc without all the hassles of lightweight brake hoses, smooth lever actuation, or easy to source service parts.

Matt - 09/13/13 - 12:44pm

My concern is the top of the line road bikes from Pinarello are very much ‘one crash, one season’ type bikes; perfect for racing. I just don’t like the idea of it for a mountain bike, but I’ve also grown tired of xc racing, too.

It looks like it wouldn’t like rock strikes. They need to release a video of them hitting it with a ball peen hammer like niner did. In fact, I think every new bike part needs a ball peen hammer video.

roadrash - 09/13/13 - 3:11pm

Yeaaaa not feeling that mountain bike, Im fairly certain that it is taking a leap backwards in mtb technology and not innovating the sport. all in all I will stick to my american mtb bikes, however I would appreciate a dogma K thrown my way, no problem shredding the asphalt on that bad boy :D

patrik - 09/13/13 - 6:00pm

@Jason “Italian threaded BB” That’s the equivalent of that hipster on Diehipster.com who dragged a La-Z Boy recliner onto a NY city subway: let me do something that’s not practical, but will get the peoples talking about me.

Why not ride a freewheel unicycle or pennyfarthing while you’re at it?

fakemind - 09/14/13 - 12:33am

Any word on what kind of alloy for the lower shock mount?

Junior88 - 09/17/13 - 2:23pm

Do you guys think it would be possible to just slap some cyclocross tires on those wheels? Enough clearance?

Am thinking about using one like this for cyclocross (FCX is not as smooth and able runs over the fork rather than in.

Hope to hear your thoughts.

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