Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann’s Specialized S-Works Crux

Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann's Specialized S-Works Crux

As the current U-23 National Champion, German-Born Yannick Eckmann has been taking his carbon Specialized Crux to the top of the podium quite a bit here in the US. When it came to Worlds, Yannick was riding for his German homeland to a 16th place finish.

Check out the details after the break.

Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann's Specialized S-Works Crux

It was pretty much either Dura Ace Di2 or Sram Red out there on the course, and as a SRAM athlete, Yannick was on Red. Typical high mounting position with a Zipp Service Course SL Bar and Stem.

Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann's Specialized S-Works Crux

Specialized’ disc specific fork up front with Zipp 303 Tubbies built to SRAM straight pull hubs.

Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann's Specialized S-Works Crux

Yannick runs a Sram Red crank as well, but forgoes the Red rings in favor or Throne rings in a 38/44 combo – which probably the reason for running an older, non-yaw Red front derailleur. That’s a Challenge Limus tubbie behind the seat tube.

Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann's Specialized S-Works Crux

The newer SRAM Red derailleur is found out back with ceramic pulleys.

Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann's Specialized S-Works Crux

Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann's Specialized S-Works Crux

Yannick is on discs with Avid BB7 Road SL disc brakes doing the stopping. 140mm rotors front and rear. It also looks like the Specialized mechanics are only using half of the CPS washers – the half on the bottom.

Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann's Specialized S-Works Crux

Like a lot of cross racers, Yannick is still riding the older generation Shimano clipless pedals – in this case XT 770s. We’ve been told anything from they’re better for mud shedding to they have fewer broken axles. Cross is hard on bikes.

Pro Bike: Yannick Eckmann's Specialized S-Works Crux

Finally, a Zipp Service Course SL seatpost supports a Specialized Romin Saddle.

Comments

harrochan - 02/05/13 - 4:10pm

How are you going to be the US U-23 National Champ and ride for Germany at worlds? They should fix that.

tobi - 02/05/13 - 4:24pm

He changed his nationality and license this year, since he has bin living in the US for quite a while and being part of he German national team would mean a lot of expensive travel

Dan - 02/05/13 - 4:25pm

he has dual citizenship.

harrochan - 02/05/13 - 4:41pm

It’s a slap in the face to win the national championship of one country and then represent another one elsewhere.

Obama needs to ban him.

cxslayer - 02/05/13 - 4:46pm

It’s good to see a braze on front derailleur mount on a carbon cx bike that is positioned low enough to shift a 44t chainring.
I can just barely get my fd low enough to shift a 46t.

Wayne - 02/05/13 - 5:02pm

Ride for Germany and screw the patriotic meatballs.

Brandon - 02/05/13 - 7:28pm

“Yannick runs a Sram Red crank as well, but forgoes the Red rings in favor or Throne rings in a 38/44 combo – which probably the reason for running an older, non-yaw Red front derailleur.”

Really? Are we still thinking the Yaw front derailleur only works with Red chainrings? Because when I set up a Yaw FD with Wick Werks rings it shifted like butter. Well, not Shimano butter, but maybe old butter left out in the sun for a day or two.

Jonny - 02/05/13 - 8:23pm

What sort of Red crank is that?

Zach Overholt - 02/05/13 - 9:26pm

@Jonny, I believe it is a SRAM Red Quarq crank (S975) with a different spider and rings. I’m not going to speculate as to why, there are probably a number of reasons to do so.

Zach Overholt - 02/05/13 - 10:10pm

@Brandon, good to know. Just posturing a guess as to why they did it. Obviously, the U23 National champ should have access to new parts so getting the new derailleur shouldn’t have been an issue…

Elliott - 02/05/13 - 10:33pm

From what I understand, Eckmann was in the process of changing from German to US citizenship (at least partly because the German road national team coach told him he needed to live in Germany/Europe full time to be considered for the team) and thought that he had done everything in time/right order, but the UCI requires one complete year between switching nationalities and repping your new country at worlds.

But, USAC has no such rule, so he could compete and win U-23 in the US but can’t rep US at Worlds.

Basically, Eckmann should have started the process earlier if he wanted to race Worlds for the US. I remember him saying on cyclingdirt or another website like that over a year ago that he wasn’t going to switch, but I think the German national team coach/federation made it an easy decision. They clearly weren’t willing to work with him if he stayed here and I think he is going to go to college in the US so he decided to make the switch,

greg - 02/05/13 - 11:33pm

probably using the Red Quarq cranks for 2 reasons:
probably uses the quarq most of the time,
newRed crank has a hidden 5th bolt, there would be no chain drop pin.
small things, just speculating.

Andrew F - 02/06/13 - 9:49am

Anyone understand the rationale that Specialized has for using a different tapered steerer tube than the standard? Instead of 1-1/8″ to 1-1/2″ like most out there, Specialized uses 1-1/8″ to 1-3/8″.

Miguel M - 02/07/13 - 10:19am

Specialized used the 1 1/2 lower on a few bikes and after lots of testing they found that they can make a 1 1/8 to 1 3/8 just as stiff as the competition and their old designs while using less material. Less material means lighter and more aero.. although aero isn’t the main concern on this bike

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